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Thread: Micro-breeders

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default Micro-breeders

    I think one of the best things to come out of the Sacramento conference was the idea of raising local queens. The term "micro-breeder" was raised, kind of like those "micro-brewers" who brew local beer with the time, patience and specialities that the mega-suds cannot replicate.

    But several speakers also noted that one of the defining characteristics of high quality queens was the necessity of leaving the newly mated queen in the mating nuc for 3 to 4 weeks so she can continue to lay eggs and develop her queen scent. This also gives you a chance to test her, or at least observe her egg laying pattern.

    As a micro-breeder, I would have the time and I can easily afford to tie up my equipment for that length of time. I wouldn't have to "mate and bank" my queens for a quick turnover of the mating nuc.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    438

    what a good idea this is, Grant

    Thanks for posting it. -Danno

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Allowing the queen to lay for 4 weeks pior to picking them also improves acceptance. We are going to do that with all our queens this year. It will slow us down alittle bit, but I think it will improve our queens alot.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    I wouldnt be so quick to say that you would not need to turn over the mating nucs so quick. Depending on how many times you graft. If, for example, you are running a quenless cell builder, do you graft once, put a queen back in (or leave a queen cell) or do you take the queen cells out and do another round of cells??? Hard to say.

  5. #5

    Default

    I, too, have heard the idea of 'micro-breeders' bandied about. I think, as AHB continue to advance into areas where many of the queen producers are, the idea of local breeders will grow. Its going to be difficult to find many arguments against it.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    "I think one of the best things to come out of the Sacramento conference was the idea of raising local queens."

    Imagine that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Oregonia, OH
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Dan -
    I followed the link to your Web Page and you have some very good info for beginners. It looks like your class is first-rate. It would have prevented some of my mistakes but I guess on the bright side I have learned from my beekeeping flubs.

    I am hoping to raise a few queens this year for my own use. I guess I would be smaller than a micro-breeder, more like a nano-breeder or pico-breeder. It seems that local queens would make sense and our Ohio State Beekeepers Association has started up the Ohio Queen Rearing Project. They are holding classes and have a nice Handbook
    http://www.ohiostatebeekeepers.org/O.../overview.html

    Hopefully I can learn enough to contribute in some way.

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