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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default question on stihl chainsaw

    I have a small 011 stihl I use for trimming. The saw starts great idles good but when I rev it to full thottle it is just like you shut off the gas. no power rpms drop acts like it is going to die let off of it it will pick back up and run fine. I am thinking it is the fuel line has a kink or a pin hole I just got it out of the shop a year ago for the same thing havent even used it enough to dull the chain and it is doing it again. going to try to fix it myself if I can pinpoint the problem. I tried fresh gas that didnt work. I am going to pull the plug and check it this afternoon any suggestions would be a help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Boone County, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    908

    Default

    You need to ease into the trigger and build up the rpm's. If you just pull the
    trigger quickly and try to go full throttle it will bog down. Every chainsaw I've
    ever had has been like that. After they get warmed up it's not too bad.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    651

    Default

    Have you checked the fuel filter? Not familiar with that stihl but some saws have a filter suspended in the gas tank or elsewhere.

    Mine not a stihl a cheap version I only use one occasionally. Thinking of buying a huskie 350.
    Last edited by sc-bee; 01-02-2008 at 05:56 AM.
    sc-bee

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    if you have the wire mesh spark arrester screen make sure it's not blocked. pull the muffler check and clean screen.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

    Default

    i would check the fuel filter and the air filter. once the saw is warmed up it should run right up to speed. the fuel filter is at the end of the fuel line in the tank. you can pull it out with a piece of wire with a hook bent into it. also, blow out the carburator area with an air hose.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    avery county n.c.
    Posts
    240

    Default

    Start by cleaning the air filter. I bet that is the problem.
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    stangegardener writes:
    if you have the wire mesh spark arrester screen make sure it's not blocked. pull the muffler check and clean screen.

    tecumseh replies:
    yep if the gas is fresh this would be the first thing I would check. typically if you use too much oil in the gas mix the wire mesh will plug and begin to severly limit exhaust flow and by extension intake flow.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,393

    Default Spark Arrester Screen

    Same thing happened to my Stihl. Screen was plugged. It's not really necessary, and I would remove it and throw it away...unless you live in California...where it's the law. Never had the problem again, once I removed the screen...oh oh, now I'm gonna get it!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Start by swapping it for a Jonsred.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    peggjam the man with his jo-hanson-red.

    poetic yes....but don't the name sound a bit commie?

    mr palmer writes:
    Same thing happened to my Stihl. Screen was plugged. It's not really necessary, and I would remove it and throw it away...unless you live in California...where it's the law. Never had the problem again, once I removed the screen...oh oh, now I'm gonna get it!

    tecumseh replies:
    well it is my understanding that the screed acts to put some back pressure on the reeds (which are essential the valves) of a two cycle motor and actually prevents the engine from over reving. probable no problem if you don't run it hard or long. I don't think I would have called it 'not really necessary' but I likely would not have tossed the screen either.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    peggjam the man with his jo-hanson-red.

    poetic yes....but don't the name sound a bit commie?

    mr palmer writes:
    Same thing happened to my Stihl. Screen was plugged. It's not really necessary, and I would remove it and throw it away...unless you live in California...where it's the law. Never had the problem again, once I removed the screen...oh oh, now I'm gonna get it!

    tecumseh replies:
    well it is my understanding that the screed acts to put some back pressure on the reeds (which are essential the valves) of a two cycle motor and actually prevents the engine from over reving. probable no problem if you don't run it hard or long. I don't think I would have called it 'not really necessary' but I likely would not have tossed the screen either.
    if your engine over revs than adjust the mixture. thats what those little screws are for.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    I have two Stihl chainsaws, and also a Stihl brush cutter, and over the years I have found them to be reliable if you follow a few procedures.

    Make certain the the inlet screen in the carburetor is not clogged up due to gas gunk buildup due to sporadic use. The more often you use the saws, the less problems you will have with starting and throttle issues. Also, I used to think that stalling on these machines was due to not enough gas. I discovered that the actual problem is due to them flooding with too much fuel. They tend to run rich at startup, and you should always give them quite a bit of time to warm up to operating temperatures in the winter, and not kick them into activity too soon in the summer on highly humid days either - no blasting on the throttle until you hear them run smooth.

    Also, as with all chainsaws, use the proper chain oil for the time of year - the wrong viscosity kills more bars and chains due to gunk buildup and puts a lot more strain on the engine.

    MM

    One more thing: Check your air filter as well. The mesh on Stihl saws can get quite a buildup of fine dust on them, which in turn limits air into the mixture, they then run richer in fuel instead of the proper air/fuel mix, and stall on throttle-up. As a test, when you have this stalling issue, remove the air filter and then run the saw. You'll see what I mean.
    Last edited by MapMan; 01-10-2008 at 09:16 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Other than routine maintance, I don't have to do anything special with my Jonsered saw. I had a brand new stihl saw that was nothing but a pain. Never did run right.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peggjam View Post
    Other than routine maintance, I don't have to do anything special with my Jonsered saw. I had a brand new stihl saw that was nothing but a pain. Never did run right.
    Stihl has a great network of dealers in the U.S. I can just go down the road to get parts - I can't say that about Jonsered, even if it is a great product.

    I don't have problems with my Stihl saws either - you just have to read the operation manuals to foresee any problems.

    MM


    Maintenance

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MapMan View Post
    Stihl has a great network of dealers in the U.S. I can just go down the road to get parts - I can't say that about Jonsered, even if it is a great product.

    I don't have problems with my Stihl saws either - you just have to read the operation manuals to foresee any problems.

    MM


    Maintenance
    Don't really need dealers with Jonsered saws, such a great product. I own two of them, and other than chains and fuel filters, I haven't had to monkey with any of them. But I do have a dealer within 20 miles of me. Also have a Stihl dealer about the same distance away.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    C-saws can be touchy. I had a Cub Cadet that ran perfect. 16" model. Bought a 20" unit and had every problem under the sun. Finally gave up after I cracked the side case trying to put it back together for the 100th time. I figure that I had, by then, a bad carb, a bent bar, smoked clutch, plugged orifices, scratched paint and a world record for chain saw tossing under my belt. Bought a 20" Husqvarna and except for the typical bogging down when it first starts in the cold weather, it never stops running. For all I know, I could buy another one...exactly the same model, and have trouble. My bear hunting guide owns and swears by Stihl but respects Husquies as well. I was at his house for a week a couple of years ago and watched him chew up a couple of cord of hardwood with his Stihl like there was no tomorrow. If you buy decent quality.....not WalMart special, you're probably OK so long as you don't mind a little crankiness now and again.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    ravenseye writes:
    Bought a 20" Husqvarna and except for the typical bogging down when it first starts in the cold weather, it never stops running. For all I know, I could buy another one...exactly the same model, and have trouble.

    tecumseh replies:
    well the saw I have always used for myself is the husky.... after 20 years the original one finally just got tired. there are two seperate lines of huskys the consumer products line (usually obtainable via Lowe's or some equivalent) and the professional line of saw (I purchased my via a catalog). the price on the professional line begins at about the place where the consumer product line ends.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

    Default

    I have 2 Stihls (one is an 038 and the other is an 011)and they both run very well even though they are about 20 years old at least. Anytime I have a problem its because i didn't clean it (air filter, carburator)in a while.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159
    I have a Farm Boss I bought in the 80's and a Pro I got a real deal on about '00. That Pro is the machine! But it is all in the sharpening, I was doing a bee tree with some tree trimmers one day and used their saw instead of going to the truck and getting mine. The blade on theirs cut wood like it was melting butter! I never felt any resistance, the blade parted the wood like water. I asked what the secret was to sharpening and they said they didn't sharpen their blades, they take them to someone. Go figure.

    My first saw I bought was from an organic gardening catalog. Some little obscure German saw for $79. plus S&H. Those tiny saws are a must for the little trimming and saving your arms and back. Never heard of the company again, but that little saw cut many cords of wood until I stepped up to the plate and got a Stihl. Still have it, but haven't pulled the rope on it for years.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default

    Bullseye, that's the truth. Sharpening makes all the difference. I get so frustrated when I sit down and spend time sharpening the chain. Seems like it takes forever. Then, I go out and about 5 minutes later I'm just smoking the wood again. I take my chains to a guy who works for me. I don't know what he does, but when I get them back they cut better than new and last a lot longer. It's just a skill that I'll need to learn!
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

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