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  1. #1
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    Oct 2004
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    Lyons, CO
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    Default Framing an interior wall w/ pocket door

    I'm thinking about pocket door "kits", and I'm told that they're 5.5" wide. That plus drywall means a wall that's 6.5" wide, so do I infer correctly that interior walls (at least if I want a pocket door) need to be framed with 2X6 lumber? Are interior walls usually 2X6?

    Are regular interior door kits (jamb, stile, knob etc) that wide too?

    This is a totally non-bearing wall BTW, just splitting up a huge room. I get a shop/man-cave! Sometimes it's especially easy to love my wife .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  2. #2
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    Apr 2006
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    Indian Valley, Virginia
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    Default

    interior walls are usually framed with 2x4's. however, i framed the plumbing wall in my bathoom with 2x6's to make space for the pipes. sounds like you need to do the same for the pocket door. interior prehung doors are made for 2x4's.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Brewcat View Post
    I'm thinking about pocket door "kits", and I'm told that they're 5.5" wide. That plus drywall means a wall that's 6.5" wide, so do I infer correctly that interior walls (at least if I want a pocket door) need to be framed with 2X6 lumber? Are interior walls usually 2X6?
    Ben -

    Standard pocket door kits are 3.5" wide, the same width as a 2X4, since most walls are framed this way. You can get the kits for 2X6 framing which would be the 5.5" width you looked at. Unless you need the extra width, get the standard 3.5" thick kit.

    Are regular interior door kits (jamb, stile, knob etc) that wide too?
    No. Standard interior jamb width is 4-5/8". That's 3.5" for the stud, 2) 1/2" drywall, one on each side, and 1/16" extra on each side of the wall for trim clearance of finished wall surface.

    - Barry

  4. #4
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    Default

    That makes more sense. I should've just gone and looked myself rather than get it from the 16-year-old kid who answered the phone .
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  5. #5
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    Apr 2005
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    College Station, Texas
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    what Barry said... plus they make them in various widths, standard width in a kit from folks like Lowe's and Home Depot are typically 24" to 36". You can of course go special order and go double and non standard (oversized) widths. if the wall is truely non load bearing then width should be no limitation. if the wall is loadbearing then you would need to structurally frame over the door opening.. ie build a header.

  6. #6
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    Wouldn't I need the header anyway to attach the track to? I suppose if not technically a "header" then at least something to hang that track off of.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  7. #7
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    Pepperell, MA.
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    Default

    tecumseh was talking about a true header as in the load bearing / load transferring type. Yes, you do need a structural element to attach the track to but it's technically not a header so much as it is a frame member.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Brewcat View Post
    Wouldn't I need the header anyway to attach the track to? I suppose if not technically a "header" then at least something to hang that track off of.
    The pocket door "kits", or pre-hung units, include the track already mounted to a 1X4 that extends across the top of the unit. Either way, you would want some sort of header across the top to keep the wall and pocket door unit tied together, even if it's just a couple 2X4's across the top. I don't know if you have framing (ceiling) above the wall or if it's open. If ceiling, then you have members to attach to.

    - Barry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    avery county n.c.
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    Ben...If you can, go with a 2 x6 wall and don't use a kit with long pieces that make the pocket walls. You will need to purchase the track or kit first anyway so you will know how high up the header should be. It's in the directions. Then for the pocket walls you can use 2 @ 2 x 6 turned flatways for each pocket wall. Much stiffer and cheaper than the kit walls.
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    College Station, Texas
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    Default

    if I was doing this for myself (or some friend) I would do as beehoopers suggest. the assembled kit is a bit more user friendly and does not require much experience to make the alteration work.

    as beehoopers also suggest the assemble kit may seem a bit flimsey especially where the door tucks into the wall.

    I really do like pocket door due to the space they save and have them almost exclusively throughout my own house... all were constructed from hardware components and not assembled kits.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Lyons, CO
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    Hunh. Hadn't thought about making a pocket door, but that makes sense.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    avery county n.c.
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    For high end work and when using 8' doors I make torsion boxes with 1 1/8" stock skinned with 1/4" plywood for the pocket walls.
    This is my realm. Wish I knew half as much about bees...
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

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