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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Barry, TX USA
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    Default Preventing Drift

    I've just reread Brother Adam and am wondering about the benefits of setting hives in groups like he recommended. His claim was that it helped prevent drift and this was important to him as he pursued TM resistant stock. I also remember Ormond Aebi's claim that he could tie different colored rags to the landing boards of hives and direct bee movement between hives. Would it be beneficial to set up hives in different directions and in odd groupings instead of nice straight lines to help prevent drift. Would it also be helpful to paint hives different pastel colors to help bees find their home and prevent drift?

    I understand that drones will still drift. I also understand that commercial beekeepers cannot set up their hives like this. Please don't respond with these answers. Has anyone used techniques like this to help prevent drift and therefore reduced the spread of Varroa, TM, AFB, EFB or CCD?

    Besides the pleasing effect of different colored hives in chaotic groups, is there any benefit that anyone has noticed? I think this would mimic the distribution of feral hives in nature. Bees don't set up hives in nice straight lines and don't paint them all the same color.

  2. #2
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    Jan 2007
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    berkshire county MA
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    Default

    I like the looks of different color hives and I also do it to make it easier for the bees to find the right hive and discourage drifting. When I'm painting my boxes, I'll start with one color, say yellow, paint a few boxes, then add a little blue to it, do a few more, add some more blue etc and come out with different shades of yellow and green, or add red to get shades of yellow-orange

  3. #3
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    Jan 2001
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    New York City
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    Default

    Sure! Research hives often have color patches of 3, 6, and even 9
    primary colors, and this has been shown to help the bees find the
    right hive. Beekeepers can reduce drifting by using something as
    simple as a painted plastic coffee can lid held to the hive with
    a thumbtack.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    I think its important if you are planning on raising queens. A little drift between production hives for honey is no big deal. But raising queens in hives lined up in a row and painted the same color can cause larger than normal queen loss on mating flights , etc.

    Here is a picture of a nuc yard. I position the nucs at different angles and paint the boxes different colors.

    http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...ictures046.jpg

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Orlando, FL
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    Default

    Does anyone make something pre-painted in colors that Bees can see and recognize.

    Surely something could be made inexpensively and printed or painted to last. I just don't have time to make them myself. I'd buy and use them if something were available.
    Troy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Evansville, IN, USA
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    Default

    >color patches of 3, 6, and even 9 primary colors . . .

    Ah . . . there are only 3 "primary colors"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Texas City, Tx
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    183

    Big Grin really?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
    >color patches of 3, 6, and even 9 primary colors . . .

    Ah . . . there are only 3 "primary colors"
    that not what the voices inside my head are saying. Each voice has their own primary colors
    you must endeavor to persevere

  8. #8
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    Evansville, IN, USA
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    Default

    From red, yellow and blue ALL other colors can be blended. Thus, they are known as “primary colors”.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    How do you make pink?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Denton, N.C.
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    68

    Default

    I think you just add white to red.

  11. #11
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    Jan 2001
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    New York City
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    Default

    Only three colors?
    Well, perhaps only three at a time, sometimes, but we have
    many sets which which to choose:

    1. Red, Yellow, Blue (Subtractive)
    2. Magenta, Yellow, Cyan (Additive)
    3. Magenta, Yellow Cyan, Black (Printing)
    4. Black, Blue, Brown, Green, Orange, Red, Violet, Yellow (Crayola)
    5. Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet (Color Wheel)

    > How do you make pink?

    An astute question! One adds white to red to make pink, as
    pink is a "tint" of red, just as gray is a "tint" of black.
    So, perhaps we need to add "white" to all the lists above.

    Anyway, I know that the Dyce Lab at Cornell uses these color
    patches with um, ah, "multiple colors" on their hives, and I know
    I've seen the same thing lots of other places.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Boone County, West Virginia, USA
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    Default

    I think what Jim actually meant was that research hives are "primarily" colored in patches of 3, 6, and even 9 different colors. This means that no, they don't use the same color on all the hives and take advantage of the bees ability to more readily recognize its home from the others by sight. Sight, smell, and location play a part in a bee returning home from foraging though you don't ever hear too much about smell being a factor.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
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    4,881

    Default Entrance disks

    [QUOTE=Troy;279220]Does anyone make something pre-painted in colors that

    How about those nuc entrance disks?


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

    Big Grin Some of the information posted is primarily wrong

    I love it! Internet “discussions” are sometimes funnier than the Bob Hope Show! Somebody posts something that is just plain wrong, has his error pointed out to him, and then will just argue and argue ad nauseum in order to be “right”.

    3, 6, and even 9 primary colors
    Ah . . . there are only 3 "primary colors"
    Only three colors?
    Well, perhaps only three at a time, sometimes, but we have
    many sets which which to choose:

    1 Red, Yellow, Blue (Subtractive)
    2 Magenta, Yellow, Cyan (Additive)

    Dr. Fischer, you have it bass ackwards. FWIW, here is the correct information:

    for additive combination of colors the primary colors normally used are red, green, and blue.

    For subtractive combination of colors, as in mixing of pigments or dyes, such as in printing, the primaries normally used are magenta, cyan, and yellow

    4 Black, Blue, Brown, Green, Orange, Red, Violet, Yellow (Crayola)
    5 Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet (Color Wheel)
    Nope. Most of those result from a combination of the primary colors.

    Here’s some more useless trivia: brown is actually a shade of orange.

    “We get brown only when a yellow or orange spot of light is surrounded by light that on the average is brighter. Take any brown and exclude all the surround by looking at it through a tube, a black piece of rolled up paper, and you will see yellow or orange.”

    from: ‘Eye, Brain, and Vision’ David H. Hubel

  15. #15
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    Jul 2006
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    Nevada County, CA
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    Default

    You also asked about hive orientation. It does significantly effect drifting, but there are other factors that may be more important than drifting involved. If you have a lot of hives going to pollination, the labor savings from crowding them on pallats often facing four to six hives in only two directions, outweigh the advantages of reducing drifting. If you have fewer hives in a location where sunlight is spotty, it's best to face all the hives so that they get the earliest morning sun. If human traffic is a concern the hives might go in a row facing into a hedge to force them to fly up higher before they reach the area where they might bother people. I think as noted earlier in this thread, drifting is really only an important concern for queen breeding, and even all the big queen breeders end up pallatizing and orienting their hives more with convienience to the forklift driver than drifting in mind. If you have just a few backyard hives, orientation should revolve around what you find pleasing, your wife will put up with, and what will cause the least friction with neighbors with drifting being the last consideration.
    doug

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    dekalb,alabama,USA
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    80

    Default Drifting

    The type bees you use also affects Drifting, For instance the Darker Races of Bees have less of a Drifting problem and a better ability to locate their Hive when it has been moved than do most of the yellow races, Generally Speaking.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Merrimac, Massachusetts, USA
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    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
    >color patches of 3, 6, and even 9 primary colors . . .

    Ah . . . there are only 3 "primary colors"
    That sentence could be construed or misconstrued in an entirely different way.
    For instance, I drive 9 primary vehicles, a Caravan, a van, a pickup truck, a station wagon, 2 motorcycles, a fork lift, an order picker, and a reach truck.

    So, in Dave W's case, 'primary' is not referring to the primary colors, but to the color set that he primarily uses.
    Tai
    ECBA Essex County Beekeeping Association #;~)

  18. #18
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Default

    Boy was I off. I though someone would mention that pink is just the same color but with an absence of of some level of red. Of course I had focused on Dave's use of the word "blend" which indicates if you have three paint cans, one blue, one yellow, and one red, you can make any other color. But of course without white, that would be false.

    But I can clearly see that any self-diagnosis of my own winter fever setting in, has been surpassed by other's more severe cases.

    Isn't black the combination or inclusion of all colors? So could you not, with the right technique, abstract any color you want from just having black as your primary color?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    dekalb,alabama,USA
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    80

    Default Primary Colors

    The Primary Colors are Red, Blue, and Green, at least that was what I was always taught when I worked on T. V. s years ago as a sideline and they were the colors produced from which all other colors were produced on the television sets.

  20. #20
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    Sep 2004
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    Default

    Isn't black the combination or inclusion of all colors? So could you not, with the right technique, abstract any color you want from just having black as your primary color?
    Black is not a color. Black is the absence of color. White is the combination of all colors. As previously mentioned by a few of us, there are three primary colors. The other colors are abstracted from a combination of the three primary colors. The three primary colors mentioned are for those of humans. For bees the three primary colors are Blue, Yellow, and Ultraviolet (that according to at least Ribbands, Winston, and Goodman).

    To further complicate matters, any color can be obtained by mixtures of light of three wavelengths in the right proportion, provided the wavelengths were far enough apart.

    :confused: btw, didn't you guys learn all that stuff back in the 8th grade???
    Last edited by Dick Allen; 12-15-2007 at 11:51 AM.

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