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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    I usually grow about 15 different varieties from year-to-year. I order them from Tomato Growers Supply Company.
    How was the germination on your seed from them? The reason I ask, is I ordered from four different firms last year - trying some new varieties - and of a couple dozen varieties, at least 1/2 of the varieties that I purchased from Tomato Growers had poor germination rates. None of the other supplier's seed caused me any problems. Same time and method of seed starting, so I know it isn't me.

    MM

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    809

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    My germination has always been close to 100% and I have ordered from them for the last four years. I do use mat heaters under the seed trays in the green house and I start them the last day of January. There has been snow on the greenhouse before and the seeds still sprouted.

    This coming year I will have some intensive lighting as well, placed about two inches above the seedlings. Last year, even tho they were in a greenhouse, they got too leggy too fast.

    Tomato Growers always throws in a free package of Marianna Peace seeds too so I always have those growing in a corner somewhere. Can't beat that. Shipping is dirt cheap.

    Also, you can buy collections of tomato seeds there. Last year I bought the heirloom collection.

    I've heard of the Sungold cherry tomatoes. Someone at my wife's garden club was talking about them. I think I will seek some of those out this next year.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

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    Sungold can't be beat for production and vigor, even in Texas heat. I planted one Sungold this past Summer and placed it in a cage under a cattle panel trellis that I made by bending it into an inverted "U". That plant grew up out of the cage, up over the trellis (which is about six ft tall), trailed over the trellis and to the trellis in the next tomato spot, grew up and over a huge Cherokee purple that I had planted about four feet away), and was loaded with fruit all Summer. It has small orange tomatoes with the perfect taste, imo, for salads- sweet and a little tart. I have seeds left from last year, so if you have any trouble finding seeds, let me know.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Kingston Springs, Tennessee
    Posts
    32

    Deer Deterrent

    Quote Originally Posted by honeyman46408 View Post
    When you find a way to keep the deer out will you post it here ??
    We use chunks of Irish Spring soap to keep the deer away. This soap is really strong in smell and deer just don't seem to like it as long as it's smelly.

    I cut a bar into chunks and skewer each chunk on a straightened out metal clotheshanger that is stuck into the soil around the plant I don't want eaten. Part of the trick seems to be having the soap at nose height when the deer are grazing. I haven't had much success just putting the chunks on the ground around plants.

    The soap chunks have to be periodically replaced when they lose their smell.

    I just noticed that a shrub has been nibbled on last week - not bad when you consider that the soap chunk with that shrub lasted for 7 months.

    Good luck!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

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    MM, ever made the aquaintance of Martin Longseth/Paquebot in Sun Prairie?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcross View Post
    MM, ever made the aquaintance of Martin Longseth/Paquebot in Sun Prairie?

    No, I haven't. I get "down there" occasionally - used to live in Sun Prairie... I understand that he is big into onions in addition to saving seed from heirloom tomatoes.

    I'll agree with him - Wisconsin 55 is one of the mainstays of tomatoes - great all-purpose tomato, open-pollinated, developed before the shift to F1 hybrids. I'll have to contact Martin. Thanks-

    MM

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    809

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    Quote Originally Posted by dragonfly View Post
    ...placed it in a cage under a cattle panel trellis that I made by bending it into an inverted "U".
    Bending a cattle trellis? See Dragonfly, with statements like this, folks will easily mistake you for a male. I don't think I could do that.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    Bending a cattle trellis? See Dragonfly, with statements like this, folks will easily mistake you for a male. I don't think I could do that.
    It's obvious that you don't know what a cattle panel is.

    MM

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    809

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    Guilty as charged.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    Bending a cattle trellis? See Dragonfly, with statements like this, folks will easily mistake you for a male. I don't think I could do that.
    Ya wanna see pictures?
    Honestly, I do them myself. Also, honestly, I built my own garden shed with my own hands. Even raised the walls myself.

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