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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,361

    Default Seed catalogs in Nov.

    It's snowing, the 1st week of December and my 2008 Gurney Spring Seed Catalog is sitting on my desk! I ordered a ton of seeds this year . Must be I'm ln the A-List now, likely 2 mailing names before Jim Fischer. I know the wildlife here is very apprecitive, We have gaggles of fat woodchucks, raccoons and deer who ( do you call wildlife who?)while I was running around doing other things, made good use of my efforts this summer.

    Fischer, where's Jim, Ha, all I really care about is that mine was 1st!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Yeah, I got a Pinetree Garden Seed catalog last week- was surprised that it already arrived. I don't even start thinking about seeds until the end of Feb when I start tomatoes and peppers inside. Oh well, it gives me something to pour over on the cool gray days of Winter when I can't be out pulling weeds.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    I got both of those catalogs, plus totally tomatoes!

    Every year they arrive earlier and earlier. Just like the Christmas decorations.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
    Every year they arrive earlier and earlier. Just like the Christmas decorations.

    Man, you've got THAT right. This year, the local Walmart had Christmas stuff out in October. Before it's all over, Christmas items will be on their shelves year-round

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    I just ordered a "totally tomatoes" catalog. I think I am going to try growing some of these.

    http://www.peppermania.com/annuum_seeds_13.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    iddee, I've grown a few varieties of heirloom tomatoes for several years now and would be happy to recommend some to you if you like. Your climate is probably a little cooler there, but still hot in Summer, huh? I was picking tomatoes last week It was a good year here for toms.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    So far I've gotten the totally tomatoes catalog, Gurneys, and Vermont Bean Seed Company, which actually has about 12 full pages of just bean varieties. I'd like to try them all. Anybody got a few acres they want to till up?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by berkshire bee View Post
    So far I've gotten the totally tomatoes catalog, Gurneys, and Vermont Bean Seed Company, which actually has about 12 full pages of just bean varieties. I'd like to try them all. Anybody got a few acres they want to till up?

    I have a few acres that I will till up if you will come and control bugs and weeds
    Oh, and water.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by iddee View Post
    I just ordered a "totally tomatoes" catalog. I think I am going to try growing some of these.

    http://www.peppermania.com/annuum_seeds_13.html
    OMG! Eight on the hot scale! Pickled Peter Peppers for gifts? What on earth would she do with them! Can you imagine how they would burn? No, wait a minute, don't go there...
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
    Posts
    696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonfly View Post
    Yeah, I got a Pinetree Garden Seed catalog last week (and Totally Tomatoes, for that matter, I've never ordered from them) - was surprised that it already arrived. I don't even start thinking about seeds until the end of Feb when I start tomatoes and peppers inside. Oh well, it gives me something to pour over on the cool gray days of Winter when I can't be out pulling weeds.
    Pinetree is always the first catalog for me, too. I've ordered quite a bit from them, they have good prices on seed potatoes. I also order lots from Johnny's and The Cook's Garden. Last year I also ordered from Nichols. I love gettingn those catalogs and dreaming of next year's garden!
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    And here I was a little worried when those peppers made me do a double take in the catalog last week. Nice to know there's a few other guys in the same boat

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default Inferno

    Quote Originally Posted by dcross View Post
    And here I was a little worried when those peppers made me do a double take in the catalog last week. Nice to know there's a few other guys in the same boat
    When I was a kid, I had a garden where I liked to grow all kinds of different varieties - nothing was too unusual. One year, I grew some Scotch Bonnet peppers... One of the neighbor's kids (about seven year's old) was watching me pick some tomatoes, and he thought he would help. He asked if he could eat one of the tomatoes, I said "Sure, go ahead". My back was turned, and unbeknown to me, he had picked one of the Scotch Bonnets, and yep - he took a bite out of it. His father later came out to me, and asked me what I done to his kid - he was in great agony! I never grew those peppers again - they are lethal weapons!

    MapMan

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MapMan View Post
    When I was a kid, I had a garden where I liked to grow all kinds of different varieties - nothing was too unusual. One year, I grew some Scotch Bonnet peppers... One of the neighbor's kids (about seven year's old) was watching me pick some tomatoes, and he thought he would help. He asked if he could eat one of the tomatoes, I said "Sure, go ahead". My back was turned, and unbeknown to me, he had picked one of the Scotch Bonnets, and yep - he took a bite out of it. His father later came out to me, and asked me what I done to his kid - he was in great agony! I never grew those peppers again - they are lethal weapons!

    MapMan
    Ouch! I like hot but they are too hot even for me.

    Received my FEDCO catalog from Maine. I'm limiting my plantings until I get the deer problem under control.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawnwri View Post
    Ouch! I like hot but they are too hot even for me.

    Received my FEDCO catalog from Maine. I'm limiting my plantings until I get the deer problem under control.

    When you find a way to keep the deer out will you post it here ??
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Some of the catalogs that I get early tend to get lost as I pile other mail on top of them. The Totally Tomatoes is a good catalog - I planted a couple dozen tomato varieties last year, and made some more good assessments on what I prefer in a tomato. I'll bet I have tried on the order of 300-400 different tomato varieties over the years (some unreleased from seed banks, too).

    I do a lot of canning - being I have an Italian heritage, I make a lot of sauces, so I prefer tomatoes with a lot of meat, and little juice. I also do like tomatoes full of sweetness and flavor - it is really amazing the differences in taste, from one year to the next, and in different soils. I have no use for the gigantic tomatoes (what are you really going to do with a 2-3 lb tomato the size of a dinner plate)! I find that the medium size (6-7 ounce fruits) fit well in the Squeezo and mason jars. I like these varieties, which work equally well for canning or for fresh eating: Amish Paste (paste), Campbell's 1327, Halley 3155 (all purpose), Heinz 1350 (all purpose), Italian Giant Paste (large-sized paste), Martino's Roma(paste), Opalka(paste), Principe Borghese (drying), San Marzano(paste), Super Marzano(paste).

    Best tasting (some unusual) heirlooms I've tried - all sizes: Abe Lincoln (red), Banana Legs (yellow - elongated), Black from Tula (black), Box Car Willie (red), Brandywine OTV (red/orange), Costoluto Genovese (large, ribbed red), Druzba (red), Glacier (very early red), Kellogg's Breakfast (orange), Marianna's Peace (pink), Mortgage Lifter (pink), Mr. Stripey (red with yellow stripes), Mule Team (red), Northern Lights (early yellow/orange), Paul Robeson (purple), Snow White (white), Wins All (rose/pink), Yellow Pear (yellow).

    MapMan

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonfly View Post
    iddee, I've grown a few varieties of heirloom tomatoes for several years now and would be happy to recommend some to you if you like. Your climate is probably a little cooler there, but still hot in Summer, huh? I was picking tomatoes last week It was a good year here for toms.
    Dragonfly, I've been harvesting tomatoes all the way up to last weekend when we had our first freeze. I don't know about where you are but here, even though the tomatoes are red and look really good, the taste doesn't compare to those that mature in the hot mid-summer sun.

    I usually grow about 15 different varieties from year-to-year. I order them from Tomato Growers Supply Company.

    http://www.tomatogrowers.com/

    Last year was the first year I grew several varieties of oxhearts. Those were impressive.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    I don't know about where you are but here, even though the tomatoes are red and look really good, the taste doesn't compare to those that mature in the hot mid-summer sun.



    Last year was the first year I grew several varieties of oxhearts. Those were impressive.

    I've noticed they don't have as much flavor, but at this time of year, I dehydrate alot of them to have tomatoes for cooking through Winter and Spring until next season's harvest. I add a little salt and basil before drying, and it gives the flavor a little zing. I've not tried any of the oxhearts. What is impressive about them? Taste, production, toughness of the plant regarding disease?

    We have really hot Summers here, and the varieties I have found that do well are Cherokee Purple, Arkansas Traveller, Amish Paste (great paste tomato and prolific production), Great White and Jubilee (yellow varieties), Green Zebra (which I love, but usually doesn't survive past mid-summer because it seems particularly vulnerable to early blight), and my fave cherry tomato Sungold. I tried Brandywines because of their reputation, but was disappointed with the taste. As far as old stand-by's, Superfantastic always does well in my experience in this climate.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    819

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    With the oxhearts, the first thing I noticed is the plants themselves are much larger than all the other plants, and the leaves were much larger too. Twice I had to add some height to the staking fences to support the massive foliage. And when the fruit ripens, they sure do look like an ox heart alright - massive, heavy and heart-shaped, you feel a tinge of macabe, holding it there in your hand. But it ain't worth nothin' unless it tastes good, right?

    I BBQ a lot of hamburgers in the summer heat and the big slices from those oxhearts were so big, tasty and juicy, my bun turned red and soggy all around the edges. I'm getting hungry...

    One poster here asked what good giant-sized tomatoes are. Well, first to impress your family and second, put them on hamburgers! Oh yah.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    One poster here asked what good giant-sized tomatoes are. Well, first to impress your family and second, put them on hamburgers! Oh yah.
    Or a tomato sandwich made with multi-grained heavy bodied bread, generous Hellman's, a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and a giant tomato slice

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troutsqueezer View Post
    One poster here asked what good giant-sized tomatoes are. Well, first to impress your family and second, put them on hamburgers! Oh yah.
    Hey! I said gigantic, not giant! Oxhearts are good, being that they are strawberry or heart-shaped in shape, they are certainly easier to slice and use than perhaps a flatter shaped fruit like Giant Belgium.

    I once tried to get a couple of Big Zac plants produce some massive sized fruit. I set the plants along a wide perforated drainage tube, and watered them with a diluted fertilizer every day or two. I thinned the fruit to two to three per cluster, and that summer they grew to massive sizes, approaching four 1/2 pounds per fruit for one plant. It was a lot of work, cool to see them grow, and certainly impressive, but I would need to grill a 2 pound hamburger in order to fit a slice off that tomato!

    I get a quite a bit if satisfaction from growing tomatoes, even in the greenhouse in winter.

    MM

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