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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default In State Queens or Out of State Queens

    If having the choice of buying queens from a producer in state versus out of state, it is better to buy in state?

    What I am really asking is if there is an advantage of queen from the samel regional area versus buying from someone, in say, North Carolina.

    I wonder how much calamatics (sp?) plays a part on the overall performance of queens.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Support your local bekeeper!


    Support your local bees!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    " Support your local bekeeper!"

    But what if their bees Stink!?? They want to much!?? Or/and they Stink!??

    If what you need is local get it, if not get it somewhere else and make them local.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    Chef,
    Check out this link recently posted...The discussion there relates to your question and may be of help to you.
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=214817

    Seasons greetings...
    Fred Bee
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    "...What I am really asking is if there is an advantage of queen from the samel regional area versus buying from someone, in say, North Carolina..."
    That's a good question. Things to ponder:

    1. There are many that breed queens who have dedicated their lives to learning and improving their stock. Keep reading here on Beesource and you'll figure out pretty quickly who the good breeders are and where they are located, if you haven't already.

    2. I prefer to get queens from a climate similar to mine. Fact is, they do better for me. So, I have focused on breeders in the north. I've look at Beesource members profiles to determine where they are located.

    3. I joined my local bee assocations and have asked the members who supplies their queens. I've also noticed members here advertising in my regional assocation publications and I tend to want to support those people. I prefer to deal with localized (within a few hours of me) queen supplier(s) for a few reasons:

    - proximity, in the event I want to visit them because I have a problem or want to learn or just want to bend their ear...(most beekeepers love to blab about honeybees - have you noticed!).
    -transit time, - maybe I might prefer to pick up the queens personally to lower their stress level, due to delayed transit, hot spring/summer days, etc. This is speaking from experience; a USPS screw up in particular...(another story).

    4. Availability if the breeder is important to me. As a few here know, I don't hesitate to pick up the phone and ask questions.

    Anyway, in my case, I do believe that northern queens, from areas similar to my location do way better and I'll continue to develop relationships with those breeders that make my short list. So far the few that I deal with are personable, have a passion for honeybees, are extremely knowledgeable, and I'm happy to say are now friends (and they are all on Beesource).

    Just my two cents...and without Beesource I wouldn't have found the queen breeders I deal with today...
    Last edited by Jeffzhear; 12-08-2007 at 08:08 AM. Reason: I had my numbering screwed up...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    The questions to ask any queen supplier are fairly simple:

    1) What do you select for?

    2) What do you test for?

    3) If your queens turn out to not even be tracheal mite resistant,
    do I get replacements that are?

    4) How do you verify that the queen is well-mated and laying?
    Over what period of time?

    5) Who buys your queens that I could talk with about their experience?

    6) How far is your operation from the nearest SHB infestation?

    7) How far is your operation from the nearest AHB infestation?

    8) If you slip schedule on delivery, what sort of discount do I get
    for the lost time?

    9) Where do you get your breeder queens?

    10) Whats the difference between your queens and everyone else's,
    and how can we quantify these differences?

    Clearly, some guy grafting queens in his backyard is not going to
    have answers to even half these questions, so you get what you
    pay for.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fischer View Post
    10) Whats the difference between your queens and everyone else's,
    and how can we quantify these differences?

    Clearly, some guy grafting queens in his backyard is not going to
    have answers to even half these questions, so you get what you
    pay for.
    Clearly, this is the most basic and important question to ask the breeder and yourself. For myself, buying queens was one "recommended routine practice" of beekeeping that I dropped early on. The cost of queens simply didn't pay off. I could keep my bees raising their own queens and not experience a shortcoming. For a guy running a handful of hives, let nature work for you. If your commercial, your experience will probably come to a different conclusion.

    - Barry

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