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Thread: Mites or CCD?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

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    howdy od...

    in regards to your picture.. are those little piles of dead bees at the bottom associated with the dead hive in question? if yes... then the second thing (it casually looks quite a bit like an insecticide kill which would be my first thought) that comes to mind is Isreali Acute Paralysis Disease (IAPV). I have not directly tested for this new problem (you need live affected bees I am informed by the lab). I have seen one or two suspected cases here. typically the time from first effect (accumlating dead bees at the front entry) to a dead out is just about two months...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    9

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    > Isreali Acute Paralysis Disease (IAPV).

    Hold on there, IAPV killed hives in Israel, but the variant/strain we have
    here in the USA has not been anywhere near as virulent, and by itself,
    clearly does NOT kill hives. In fact, the IAPV found in samples taken from
    hives in 2002-2006 were a surprise simply because the samples were
    taken from apparently healthy hives.

    > I have seen one or two suspected cases here.

    You have? Wow, that's interesting, as these would have been the
    first cases ever reported in the USA. Next time, get some sample
    bees in the fridge and some samples in the freezer. (Freezing can
    break apart virus particles, while mere fridge storage can create
    a problem with long-term preservation, so doing both is the best
    way for a beekeeper to store samples before he contacts one
    of the labs.)

    > typically the time from first effect (accumulating dead bees at the
    > front entry) to a dead out is just about two months...

    That's much slower than the time that Sela, et al reported as the
    symptomatic kill rate from IAPV in Israel in the journal "Virology"
    (July 2007). What they saw was dead brood in days, and deadout
    hives in days thereafter. A very quick deadout.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,830

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    [QUOTE=tecumseh;275961]
    in regards to your picture.. are those little piles of dead bees at the bottom associated with the dead hive in question?

    The hive is in a five foot wide space between two buildings and the dead bees accumulate from four other hives as it is a steep climb for the undertaker bees to haul them out. Since this is a residential area there are no blanket pesticide sprayings that I know of.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

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    first mr fischer writes:
    Hold on there, IAPV killed hives in Israel, but the variant/strain we have
    here in the USA has not been anywhere near as virulent, and by itself,
    clearly does NOT kill hives. In fact, the IAPV found in samples taken from
    hives in 2002-2006 were a surprise simply because the samples were
    taken from apparently healthy hives.

    and then:

    Wow, that's interesting, as these would have been the
    first cases ever reported in the USA.


    tecumseh replies:
    I am not certain the second snip totally agrees with the first snip Jim????

    I did take samples of the suspects by the state lab.... but at that time I had never even heard of IAPV so 'that' was never really on my list of stuff to look for on that occasion...

    My good neighbor down the road (those fine folks who raise queens down in Navasota, Tx) has a nitrogen tank and he has volunteered to preserve a sample for me the next time the occasion arrises.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,840

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    >>I hate to see bees die as I am sure anyone on this site will agree. If a hive is overrun with varroa, these "destructors" I will medicate. I have also seen that there is a considerable amount of money to be made in honey sales and could not attain this profit margin if all my bees are dying. I hate the idea of chemicals, but I will not let my bees perish as martyrs to the organic idealism.


    Right to the point, and right on the money.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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