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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Madrid, MO, USA
    Posts
    5

    Default Small Hive Beetle in Missouri?

    New beekeeper in Southeast Missouri. Very healthy hive (filled two supers first year despite the drought). When I robbed the honey found very small black beetle when cleaning up. I am sending to niece who is graduate entomology student for positive ID, but did not think this beetle was in my area. Anyone else find them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Default

    There is a small black sap beetle around here that is smaller than a small hive beetle and lacking in several of the anatomical features of a small hive beetle. On the other hand they have officially seen Small Hive Beetle in Nebraska now.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    I'm just North of you in Cape Country. You ask if there are Small Hive Beetles in MO?

    My answer: ABSOLUTELY!

    Should we be afraid? ABSOLUTELY!

    Have they been a problem for me? Not until this year, and then in one yard they were ABSOLUTELY EXPONENTIALLY EXPLOSIVE!

    I wrote a little story of my past year's experience, along with some of the tools and traps I used, some too late, some too little. I squandered a ton of time and energy fighting the inevitable.

    In short I will tell you full sun is easily 80% of the solution. The sandwich traps are tremendous. I counted 400 SHB in one of my traps.

    If you want a copy, send me an e-mail to gfcg7312003@yahoo.com (don't PM me as I can't send an attachment). My article will come as a Word.DOC attached to the reply.

    In the subject line in the e-mail simply put "SHB article"

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,311

    Default

    Ed Levi, a bee inspector for Arkansas, spoke about SHB at our club last spring. He had maps of counties where they were "officially" present in Arkansas. That map showed them in extreme northeast Arkansas, and that was as of 2006. I'm sure you've got em to.

    At that time, I don't think that they were "officially" in Tulsa County, where I live. But unofficially, they were in just about every hive I had looked at, but in small numbers.

    For anybody who is interested in an organic SHB control system, Ed Levi recommended a program using in hive traps with oil to drown the adults and using Nematodes on the soil around the hives to kill larvae. If I recall correctly, the life cycle is that the adults lay eggs in hive, the larvae live in the hive for about 2 days, then they crawl out of the hive and pupate in the soil, emerge as adults and so it goes. Ed cited a study that showed that the Nematodes could kill 100% of the larvae when they entered the ground. He recommended a specific species of Nematode -- can't remember the name -- because it lives longer in the soil than some others. He reports no problems with SHB using that system.

    I've not done that yet, because I have just seen a few of them in my hives. I think/hope that thespot I have my hives does not present a very good spot for them to get in the ground. To get to good soil, they would have to crawl across a driveway.

    If anybody knows the species info for the Nematodes and a source, please post it. If nobody knows, I'll see if I can track it down. I don't have contact info for Ed Levi right now, but could get it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
    If you want a copy, send me an e-mail to gfcg7312003@yahoo.com (don't PM me as I can't send an attachment). My article will come as a Word.DOC attached to the reply.

    In the subject line in the e-mail simply put "SHB article"

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Grant, First, ty for sharing your article. I found both parts very interesting and enlightening. Yet another issue to worry about and get prepared for.

    I haven't seen them yet....thankfully.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Posts
    93

    Big Grin Shb

    Grant,

    Good article and thanks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cainsville, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Small Hive Beetle Traps

    I read Grants article in Jan. ABJ, Great article. I would like to know more about the sandwich container traps. Are these something I can make myself, are there plans available, etc. I'm a hobby beekeeper in extreme northwest Missouri and have not seen SHB yet. I just want to be prepared. Thanks for any info.

    funyfarm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    There is a great video on the web. Click here:

    http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2...mall-hive.html

    Linda has several links and this video clip is one of a couple of links.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    Are there any places left where one does not need to worry about SHB?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Geneva,Florida, Seminole USA
    Posts
    290

    Default

    Possible, but hard for a FL boy to believe. The..... are relentless!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    Any places where you don't have to worry about SHB?

    Yes!

    Inside my safe deposit box at the bank. Inside the water tank on my toilet. Under the asphalt shingles on my house. In the dishwasher. In the ice maker in my freezer.

    But if it has anything to do with bees or my honey house.....well, no. I remain suspiciously wary of SHB. They are relentless.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,861

    Default

    We don't have any present in Vermont. I never experieced any until I moved to Kentucky and other than a super storage issue I don't see that they are that big of a problem. I kinda like opening up a hive watching them run from the edge of the hive tool, their guard bees in fast persuit
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Syracuse, NY (upstate)
    Posts
    247

    Default SHB in Vermont

    I wouldn't be so sure about no SHB in Vermont. I didn't think there were any in upstate New York until they wiped out a couple of nucs during a building extraction last year!

    -ekrouse

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,385

    Default

    SHB traps are good, full sun is good. Soil controls (ground drench, nematodes, etc) are questionable. The bees carry the larvae out and drop them in all directions for 100's of feet from the hive, so it makes it pretty prohibitive to cover all the ground that the bees cover with some sort of soil control. The beetles also are capable of flying for miles and home in on hives by detecting alarm pheromone. Recently it has been discovered that they infect the pollen stores with a yeast that generates the same pheromone and allows even more SHB to be attracted. So far, I have found that the combination of hygeinic bees, full sun and traps offers the best control.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    140

    Default

    They lived through the winter in my hives. I thought that they disappeared during winter and reappeared when it got warmer, but I have them in force now in my hives and I took the traps off for winter since I wouldn't be opening the hives to reapply vinegar in the frame traps and lure in the Sonny-Mel traps.

    So far they have caused no damage in my hives other than the irritation of their presence. I think the strong hive makes a lot of difference.

    My hives are on my deck, 14 feet or so above the ground and they are in the hives. They fly a long way from their birthplace to occupy hives.

    Linda T
    "You never can tell with bees...." Winnie the Pooh
    http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Austin TX USA
    Posts
    301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Weitzel View Post
    So far, I have found that the combination of hygeinic bees, full sun and traps offers the best control.
    Ditto on the sun and hygienic bees. I will add that screening them out as much as possible also helps. I would never leave an inner cover with a big open slot at the top. The combination of darkness and an opening invites them to crawl in through that slot.

    When I was using an inner cover I put a screen over the hole. I would find small hive beetles trapped in the framed lip around the screen.

    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1282/...26177d09a5.jpg

    Now I use a screened frame over the whole top super. Helps ventilation too.
    ~May your hive thrive
    Aisha

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aisha View Post
    Ditto on the sun and hygienic bees. I will add that screening them out as much as possible also helps. I would never leave an inner cover with a big open slot at the top. The combination of darkness and an opening invites them to crawl in through that slot.

    When I was using an inner cover I put a screen over the hole. I would find small hive beetles trapped in the framed lip around the screen.

    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1282/...26177d09a5.jpg

    Now I use a screened frame over the whole top super. Helps ventilation too.
    I typically don't use inner covers at all anymore. Just migratory tops. I have a few hives that still have the inner cover/standard top setup that I have not gotten around to switching to migratory tops, I looked at them a couple of days ago and they have significantly more SHB than the ones with only a migratory top. I will be switching them out this weekend.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

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