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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default Beginner at Thymol Fogging

    I just started Thymol Fogging this fall.... I'm going to give it a fair shot and see where I'm at in a year from now using this as the only tool in my mite treatment black bag. No fancy scientific study, just want to see if it will control the mites and allow my bees to thrive.

    My mite counts were already relatively low when I started, and still are. But I'll be periodically monitoring the results over time to see if it will work for me, as it apparently has for others.

    I'm wondering if there are any others who have recently decided to take the plunge. It would be very interesting to compare notes, ask questions of veteran foggers, and see what our results look like collectively.

    I have one question now for someone with experience and success with Thymol fogging.
    If your mites counts are very low, do you still continue fogging weekly as a preventive measure, or do you discontinue fogging until you notice the mite count beginning to increase and then resume the fogging regimen?

    I'm curious if success is reliant on a disciplined methodical schedule or if it works as well in a short series of treatments when conditions warrant action.
    To everything there is a season....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    There are two reasons to kill mites.

    Most beeks want to kill them all so their bees don't have to fight them.

    A few only want to kill enough to allow the bees to live long enough to adapt to life with the mite or develop the ability to do away with them on their own.

    I am the latter. I want to develop a bee that eradicate the mite without the beek's help'

    That being said, I only fog when I see the mites increasing. Then I stop fogging when the count drops. I have three yards. One gets no treatment. The bees in it have an ancestry that can be traced back into the 70's and have never been treated. One gets checked and fogged when needed. The last one is the introductory yard. It is where I place new hives until they are evaluated. Those get fogged often.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    Good deal Mike! I did the same thing you are doing for the same reason. I don't fog anymore but I'm not going to tell why. Ive made a little post here and there about it but didn't say much about it. And I don't want to influence your expectations.
    Point is with things like this, you could line up an army on both sides of the issue and still not ever get the answers you truly want for yourself without proving it to yourself.
    Best of all, one year from now when you publish your paper on it, we'll have us a new guest speaker on the hook!

    Lemme write this down here somewhere. Call Mike, set up chat room date .......... 11/15/08

    All kiddin aside, I'll be looking forward to you keeping us up on how it's doing for you!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    Iddee: A few only want to kill enough to allow the bees to live long enough to adapt to life with the mite or develop the ability to do away with them on their own.
    That's my ultimate goal too, Iddee. Right now I'm taking my first step in that direction. Later I can work on evaluating my queens, keeping and breeding from those producing bees which can do just that.


    Bizzy:
    Point is with things like this, you could line up an army on both sides of the issue and still not ever get the answers you truly want for yourself without proving it to yourself.
    I've noticed that, Bizzy, and that's why I'm attempting to put aside both camps for a while and prove to myself if this will work in my yards, on my bees, in my region. Only one way to find out for sure ... try it. I'll keep you posted.
    To everything there is a season....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Broad Brook, Connecticut
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I am interested in fogging too. I plan to research the topic more in depth through the winter and start fogging in the spring. My question is where can i find FGMO and Thymol for fogging purposes?
    Bee humble, bee happy
    Suffield, CT not Broad Brook

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    Send Iddee a private message. He may be able to help you with the Thymol. You can get the mineral oil at Wal-Mart or any drug store.
    To everything there is a season....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Broad Brook, Connecticut
    Posts
    19

    Default

    When do you seasonally start/stop fogging? Or do you fog continuously?
    Bee humble, bee happy
    Suffield, CT not Broad Brook

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    If the weather is cold enough that the bees are clustered and not flying, then I'll not fog. I think it would be counterproductive to fog and break up the cluster in cold weather. If the mites are not already under control at that point then it's probably too late anyway.
    To everything there is a season....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    491

    Default

    Mike are you going to just fog or follow the protocol by Dr. Pedro Rodriguez?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    I'm not using the cords, Ski. I'm following his Thymol fogging instructions and we'll see if fogging alone will do the trick.

    If it doesn't work then I can blame myself for not using cords, and move on to Plan B.
    To everything there is a season....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    491

    Default

    I Understand.
    I am going to try fogging again this year but this time add the cords.
    Maybe we can compare results through out the beekeeping season.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Broad Brook, Connecticut
    Posts
    19

    Default

    A fogger is definitely on my Christmas list. Next year Im using all SBB and using powdered sugar, along with my normal drone catch frames. i hope to have Varroa under better control compared to previous years.
    Bee humble, bee happy
    Suffield, CT not Broad Brook

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee,USA
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Do foggers go under the hives?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    491

    Default

    Burgess and another brand of bug foggers is what I have heard being used. You mix the FGMO and Thymol put it the fogger light it up and fog the entrance of the hive. I have a SBB and have tried fogging the space under the hive so it will go up through the SBB into the hive. If you do do a search on fogging or thymol or FGMO you should get a lot of info.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bizzybee View Post
    I'll be looking forward to you keeping us up on how it's doing for you!
    FWIW - Just a quick update on this... sold all my hives yesterday after the county inspector checked my colonies. He found no V-mites in any of the hives. This is a first for me. I've used no chems at all, just been thymol fogging every week since last fall, weather permitting, up until supers were added in April.

    Wish I could have continued this until fall for a full year evaluation, but hopefully I'll be able to pick it up again next year and start over.
    To everything there is a season....

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    edmonds, WA, USA
    Posts
    348

    Default

    I've been fogging weekly since early this spring. I believe its been effective. In hives that have the largest mite counts I have been pulling drone comb as well. I am also using the cords. Mite counts are very low in most hives. I will reduce to bi-monthly and maybe discontinue cord use When all counts are low.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Waxhaw, NC
    Posts
    65

    Default

    If you put the cords on when the mites are hitting their peak in late summer, you get the best benefit from them. The cords get tugged, pulled and rubbed against while the bees try to remove them, which results in mites being dislodged from bee bodies. The honey, oil and wax that gets on worker bodies gets cleaned off by other bees, which removes more mites. As long as you use fully screened bottom boards-and would you do otherwise with this method?-you get a good supplemental mite drop. Don't stop fogging when cords are on if you have real high mite counts. I saw something about making strips from wax paper, does anyone use this, and how does it perform vs. cotton mop strings? WJPowers

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
    Posts
    491

    Default

    The instructions for making the emulsion cords call for using a ceramic container is there anything wrong with using a stainless steel pot?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Terrell, Texas, USA
    Posts
    281

    Default

    Stainless Steel is considered a "reactive" vessel. That is, it will react unfavorably upon contact with some chemicals. Don't know if Thymol is one of them. Hence the recommendation for using Ceramic. I use a glass mason jar and it works fine. If you prepare the emulsion in your kitchen, make sure you like the smell of Vicks Vapor Rub.

    Tom

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Default Fgmo

    I fogged regularly with thymol for several years, with apparent success, and found very few mites on screened bottom boards. All 3 hives died in January of this year. I sent a sample of bees to Beltsville, and the report said that there was a very high concentration of mites.

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