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Thread: Feed honey?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Feed honey?

    If your colony died from something noninfectious, I wouldn't destroy it. There would be no need. Buy a package and put it on that comb.

    Eat the honey. Then you don't need to fear feeding it to bees.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Concord, CA
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    6

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    Thanks for responding. Too late for the hive, I already destroy it. As to the honey: it was my first year and I didn't remove the sugar-water feeder while the first two supers were being filled. I heard this results in impure honey, which is why I decided to retain it for later feeding. Since the cause of colony collapse is not known, how can I be certain death wasn't caused by infection? As it turns out, I have the bad luck of living in one of the Bay Area counties with a high rate of parasitic fly infestation--although I saw no indication of fly larvae on the few dead bees that remained in the hive.

  3. #23
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Feed honey?

    I don't know hwo you would prove one way or the other. Sorry. Can't help you there.

    Have you tasted the honey? Could still bve edible. I don't know why it wouldn't be. Unless it is off flavor or fermented, I'd try it.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  4. #24
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    Oct 2011
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    Concord, CA
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    Default Re: Feed honey?

    When I extracted it, it tasted fine to me. If I can manage to eat my way through the other two supers before the next harvest (I didn't realize how much honey one hive could produce!), I'll open it up and give it a try. Thanks for your help.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,458

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    I might consider destroying a hive if I saw AFB, which I have not. Otherwise I would not destroy equipment. Even if I saw AFB in a hive, I would probably just destroy the frames, not the boxes or the bottoms or the covers. You can scorch them or I can boil them in beeswax and rosin, if I want to sterilize them. I think the image of burning hives gets ingrained in newbees early on and they see it as a solution of some kind. It's only a solution for AFB. Not wax moths , or nosema or some unknown cause (all of which I have seen newbees destroy hives over).
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Norfolk County, UK
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    Why feed honey when it's more valuable than sugar syrup. Also it may contain disease which is harmless to humans but is harmful to bees. Heating (pasturising) will increase HMF which is harmful to bees. Feeding honey can cause robbing too.



    In the UK, AFB and EFB are "notifiable" diseases. (It's the law that the authorities are informed). Bee inspectors WILL destroy a colony with AFB by burning in a pit then burying. As a result we have very little AFB in the UK. Some have noted that AFB hotspots have occured around the sites of importers/packers. Maybe contaminated honey comes in and the containers are left outside the factory ....

    EFB is treated by destruction if severe, possibly by treatments and/or shook swarms if the colony is salvageable with destruction of the old comb.

    Other diseases can be treated one way or another. (80% Acetic Acid fumigation for Nosema spores for example). If in any doubt whatsoever, I would not use old comb with a package. Why risk it when a package should draw out clean comb quickly if fed. We are encouraged to replace all comb in a 3 year cycle to reduce the build-up of pathogens and we don't have CCD (yet, praise the Lord!)
    May your bees read the same books as you do
    http://www.norfolkbee.co.uk/home

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    778

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    .

    Very informative thread.

    The search tool is great !!!

    So, for instance, if I were to buy raw/unfiltered honey from Whole Foods (specifically Papa Carrol's brand from here in Florida), would I be running a high risk of spreading AFB to whatever bees are feeding on it?

    Papa Carroll's

    Naturally Raw Honey from the Apalachicola Forest in the Florida panhandle. The honey is bottled and naturally crystallized to a smooth texture. The abundance of wildflowers prepares you for a unique and wonderful taste.
    .

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Feed honey?

    A. It's anybody's guess at best. But, there is a chance you would.
    B. Since you shop at Whole Foods you can probably afford to buy high priced honey to feed bees, but that sort of behavior looks like a waste of money to me. Considering adequate and less expensive alternatives like sugar or corn syrup.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    778

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    A. It's anybody's guess at best. But, there is a chance you would.
    B. Since you shop at Whole Foods you can probably afford to buy high priced honey to feed bees, but that sort of behavior looks like a waste of money to me. Considering adequate and less expensive alternatives like sugar or corn syrup.
    Thanks.

    Well, here's what I am experimenting with.

    I have several bait hives and real hives set out with comb and lemongrass oil placed in them. I had the idea (even though many have warned against it because of pests and now AFB) that the scout bees probably double as foragers, or at least at some point during their approx 6-week life.

    Wouldn't I have more of a chance of attracting a swarm if more bees knew about the hives?

    I remember about 2 or 3 years ago, before I had any interest in bee keeping, my next door neighbor had their recyclables set out on the side of their house with an abundance of Mountain Dew cans and whatnot leaking-out their remains. A swarm ended up landing right near his recycling bin area. And - OF COURSE - he gets out there with a can of Raid and starts going to town. I didn't really know any better back then to try to stop him....but it's too late by the time they've been sprayed anyhow.

    So yes, I'm not trying to go against anyone's wisdom here. It's just an experiment of which I hope wouldn't have dire consequences on a hive somewhere else.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Feed honey?

    Quote Originally Posted by PatBeek View Post

    Wouldn't I have more of a chance of attracting a swarm if more bees knew about the hives?
    Not necassarily and not likely. I have stacks of palletized supers which are routinely passed by by swarms. So, what you are doing may attract a swarm, or maybe not. Keep on trying, just don't jump to conclusions concerning cause and effect.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    778

    Default Re: Feed honey?

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Not necassarily and not likely. I have stacks of palletized supers which are routinely passed by by swarms. So, what you are doing may attract a swarm, or maybe not. Keep on trying, just don't jump to conclusions concerning cause and effect.
    Duly noted. Thanks.

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