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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,033

    Default Old queen and unrelated daughter -- together

    Scene:

    -One 5-frame medium nuc of 1-1/2" styrofoam walls and cover, with a #8 mesh insert in the center bottom.
    -All five frames from one parent colony.
    -Introduced cultured queen cell.
    -At a later inspection, located dark colored, marked queen, accidentally introduced from parent colony.
    - Queen cell appears unharmed, so I am leaving the dark queen in there to see if the new queen might replace her if she emerges.
    - About one week ago, after the queen cell was already very late hatching, I removed it and discovered that, even though it appeared complete, it was entirely empty :confused:.
    - Today I was checking on this nuc and discovered that there were two queens, both laying, they were side-by-side, literally. The old dark queen was working on the same comb as my new cultured, Cordovan queen. (These two queens are entirely unrelated). This nuc was of calm disposition and the bees were not running on the combs. While I watched with fascination, I saw the two queens walk into each other, face-to-face. To be anthropomorphic, it was like when they bumped into each other, seeing them each say, "pardon me", whereupon they each promptly did a 180 degree turn and continued on their merry ways.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 10-01-2007 at 11:12 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Geneva,Florida, Seminole USA
    Posts
    290

    Default

    Bees will sometime "reseal a queencell". (sense of humor?) Sounds like she hatched out when you weren"t looking. Its not common,but two queens laying in one colony has been recorded. Sounds like a good thing to me, wish I could do it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Austin TX USA
    Posts
    301

    Default

    I would love to see a photo of that!

    You are double lucky!
    ~May your hive thrive
    Aisha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,033

    Default

    I had the same thought - about having that in a video clip. I must remember to take a digital camera with me more often.

    It would be interesting if we could breed a strain of bees that would accept multiple queens more regularly.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 10-01-2007 at 11:16 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Default

    you can image the problems encountered in just witnessing two queens in the same hive and I would suggest that it is much more common that some people might suggest. I was probably 30 plus years of age before I personally witnessed this in a hive and then saw the same thing in the very next hive I inspected (and on the same pallet).

    I would suspect that dual queens is quite unrelated to 'race' of the bees in the box. as to their genetic relationship... if you study genetics even a bit genotypic similarities are not so easy to recognize by us human and I would suspect the same is true for the bees themselves.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,122

    Default

    >I would suggest that it is much more common that some people might suggest.<

    One year, while doing some requeening, I found 30% of the colonies (17 of 50) had multiple queens...some with more than 2 laying queens.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,122

    Default

    >At a later inspection, located dark colored, marked queen, accidentally introduced from parent colony.<

    Using a queen excluder to make your nuc would have prevented this.

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