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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Winston Salem , NC
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    228

    Default Taktic

    Anyone ever use or hear of TAKTIC to be used on bees for mite control?
    larry

  2. #2
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    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default

    The active ingredient is Amitraz. At one time, Amitraz strips were available...similar to Apistan(Fluvalinate). The strips were taken off the market because of a large bee kill, said to be caused by the strips. I believe the problem was with something in the strip, not the Amitraz.

    Taktic is used in homemade chipboard strips, sometimes rotated with Mavrik(Fluvalinate).

  3. #3
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    Default

    Anyone got a formula on how to make these and the amount of taktic?
    larry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    9,649

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
    Regarding the potential harm to the hive, I can not detect any harm.
    And what method are you using for detection?
    Regards, Barry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    The active ingredient is Amitraz. At one time, Amitraz strips were available...similar to Apistan(Fluvalinate). The strips were taken off the market because of a large bee kill, said to be caused by the strips. I believe the problem was with something in the strip, not the Amitraz.

    Taktic is used in homemade chipboard strips, sometimes rotated with Mavrik(Fluvalinate).
    The manufacturer took them off the market because they were sued by some beekeepers and no longer wanted the exposure. I don't know if anyone actually determined if the strips were the cause of the bee mortality.

    They still make the cattle ear tags that came off of the same assembly line as the strips for bees. Or the other way around, I guess.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  6. #6
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default

    Hey Mike,
    What's up w/ the OA treatments? I hear you aren't seeing the effects you'd like to anymore?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  7. #7
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    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default

    >Hey Mike,
    What's up w/ the OA treatments? I hear you aren't seeing the effects you'd like to anymore?<

    Pshew! News travels fast in the north country.

    No, I'm not going to vaporize OA this year. I'm not seeing good results. Did it 3 years in a row. @004, and 2005 in mid-November. 2006 three times in September, and again in Mid-November. High mite loads in the spring.

    Not sure why it doesn't work for me. Perhaps the temps are too cold, and the clusters are too tight, and the OAv can't penetrate into the cluster. Perhaps the bees aren't broodless...although I think most are broodless or mostly broodless by mid-November. Another possibility would be the depth of the bottom board. The vaporizer sits just below the bottom bars. The wooden ones burn, and the plastic ones melt. Maybe the vapors are condensing on the bottom bars, or maybe the wax melts into the pan and effects the results. Seems like a lot of vapor coming out the top entrance, though.

    Medhat is designing a new vaporizer. Uses forced air to inject the vapors into the cluster. Maybe that will work better. I'll wait for the results. Wish I could trickle OA. My bees are wrapped for winter by the time they are broodless in mid-November. And if they aren't wrapped, and it snows much, I'll never get to them to do the work.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
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    3,604

    Default Taktic 12.5 % and 5.0%

    ALTERNATIVE DISEASE TREATMENTS--RISKS INVOLVED
    Dr.Eric Mussen in From the UC Apiaries, University of California, Davis says so-called "alternative" (unregistered and illegal) treatments make little sense to beekeepers. It all boils down to formulation of the product, he says, something companies must spend huge amounts of money developing, testing and registering.

    Administration and Dosage :
    Taktic to be used as spray or dip
    Animal Taktic 12.5%/ L of water for ticks Taktic 12.5%/ L of water for mites (mange), lice and keds
    Cattle/Camel 2.0 ml 2.0 ml
    Sheep/Goat 4.0 ml 4.0 ml
    Pigs 4.0 ml 4.0 ml


    Taktic® 5%
    Broad spectrum ectoparasiticide against ticks, mites, lice and keds.
    ________________________________________
    Composition :
    Each ml contains : Amitraz B.P (Vet) 50 mg
    Indication :
    Mites, Lice and Keds
    Taktic kills tick and ectoparasites resistant to organochlorine, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroid compounds
    Administration and Dosage :
    Taktic to be used as spray or dip
    Parasite Mixing Rate / L of water
    Ticks 6.0 ml
    Lice 6.0 ml
    Mites 10.0 ml

    Regards,
    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Smile Amitraz. The recommended dosage for use on honey bee colonies is

    ISSN 1814-1137
    AGRICULTURAL
    AND FOOD
    ENGINEERING
    AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ENGINEERING TECHNICAL REPORT TECHNICAL REPORT
    Honey bee diseases and pests:
    a practical guide
    4 4
    TC/D/A0849E/1/11.06/550
    It is obvious that apicultural industries play an important role
    in generating employment opportunities and increasing family
    income in the rural areas of the world. Control of diseases and
    pests of honey bees is one of most challenging tasks in
    improving quality of honey and honey bee by-products,
    especially for the beekeepers in developing countries.
    This publication describes common diseases and pests of
    honey bees and their importance and provides a practical
    guide to the basic technology available to beekeepers for
    their control and prevention.
    The publication is further evidence of the continuing
    endeavours of FAO to promote beekeeping in developing
    countries, as a low-cost means of improving local diets,
    elevating purchasing power and diversifying rural activities.
    Honey bee diseases and pests:
    a practical guide


    Here is some data that i got from a web search: Use with extream caustion.
    Amitraz
    Taktic and Mitac are trade names of products containing amitraz at different concentrations.

    The recommended dosage for use on honey bee colonies is

    sprayed lightly on bees, the comb surface of brood frames and hive walls.

    The amount of the solution to be sprayed at each application depends on the size of the colony, but
    is usually within the range of

    Amitraz can also be used as a hive fumigant.

    Strips of filter paper 2.5 x 9 cm are soaked in a

    Note that amitraz can kill bees.

    A major disadvantage of amitraz is that it has an ovicidal effect: when used
    as a hive spray it will kill eggs.

    It must therefore not be sprayed directly on frames containing a considerable
    number of eggs or newly-hatched larvae.

    Regards,
    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    Last edited by Barry; 03-04-2012 at 09:05 AM. Reason: off label use
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
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    Smile It is time that the industry spread the truth about amitraz.

    Eric Mussen
    Entomology Extension
    University of California
    Davis, CA 95616

    Discussions with beekeepers
    lead me to believe that many of
    them think that amitraz is an
    effective chemical for controlling
    tracheal mites. This idea may have
    originated when another, no longer
    available, plastic strip called
    Miticur®, was registered for
    tracheal mite control. The active
    ingredient in that strip was
    amitraz.
    If you remember the history
    of that strip, it was supposed to
    knock back tracheal mite
    infestations. However, one or more
    large beekeeping operations lost
    very large portions of their
    operations when the strips failed
    to control the mites. The
    beekeepers sued the chemical
    company for the losses and the
    strips were removed from the
    market.
    A thorough reading of many
    papers dealing with control of
    tracheal mites with amitraz
    (Ovasyn®, Mitac®, and Taktic®)
    reveals that very few studies
    resulted in good control, if the
    amitraz was introduced as a
    contact treatment. Many authors
    had no luck reducing infestations,
    unless the amitraz was used as an
    aerosol spray or as a burning
    “fume strip.”
    Therefore, beekeepers who
    have been relying on amitraz to
    control their tracheal mite
    infestations have not been getting
    the results that they desire.
    There was a time when amitraz did
    control Varroa mites effectively,
    but continued use of amitraz for
    tracheal mite control (?) led to
    selection for resistance to
    amitraz in Varroa mites,
    simultaneously to the selection
    for resistance to fluvalinate.
    So, this winter, it appears
    that something prompted a resurgence
    of tracheal mite outbreaks
    in some beekeeping operations.
    Treatments with amitraz made
    little difference and the colonies
    collapsed. It is time that the
    industry spread the truth about
    amitraz and tracheal mites:
    contact applications of amitraz
    (and its miniscule fumigant
    action) do not control tracheal
    mites.

    Sincerely,
    Eric Mussen
    Entomology Extension
    University of California
    Davis, CA 95616
    Phone: (530) 752-0472
    FAX: (530) 752-1537
    Email: ecmussen@ucdavis.edu
    URL:entomology.ucdavis.edu/faculty/mussen
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    807

    Default

    Want to mix to your own? Got your own time proven formula?

    You'd better watch M. Frazier's March 8th video first. Half way through the video, toxicity of fluvalinate and the different and conflicting LD/50 ratios are discussed. And much more is known about fluvalinate than is known about amatraz.

    http://www.BeeUntoOthers.com/

    Sure you still want to mix it up? Save a few dollars?
    Good luck. You're going to need it. And if you do, I feel sorry for your bees!

    Regards
    Dennis
    Thank you DeKnow for the video.
    Last edited by BWrangler; 03-14-2008 at 09:32 PM. Reason: changed link
    I once wrangled bees. But now, I know better, so I do better.
    http://talkingstick.me/category/bees/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Re: Taktic

    Sunday, June 13, 2010
    Are their any up-dates on the use of Taktic?
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    5,039

    Default

    >>>>"All honey boxes are to be removed while treating. NOTICE I do not condone using the Tactic/Amitraz treatment for obious reasons."

    I'm glad that I produce my own drug free honey so that I don't have to eat any of your guy's. Nothing like breaking the pesticide laws and probably polluting your crop. Feel sorry for your customers.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    833

    Sad

    When using Tactic there is only one treatment necessary and you kill mites for several years. What’s happen after this is not a secret …> the mites kill your colonies.

    Your combs working like a sponge and the poison will sit in the wax for years. The contamination will get lower by the years and this is the time where mites getting resistance.

    Bees store honey in combs like this and your customers don’t know it. There are so many other possibilities to treat a hive without contaminating your customers.

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