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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default Killing AFB spore

    Hey all,

    I've been running around the net looking for actual information on AFB. I'm trying to find out what temp the spores actually die at. I keep finding info that they are resistant to very high temperatures, but being a carbon based life form, there has to be a threshold where the spores die. Does anyone know these actually numbers? ie XX degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit for X hours?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    141 degrees C for 20 minutes under something like 15 psi of steam heat. Dry heat/atmospheric pressure will not be effective unless higher temps/longer times are used. Beware, 141 C is about the flash point of beeswax.

    You may want to search the archives for previous discussions on the use of lye, bleach, ethylene oxide, etc.
    Last edited by Aspera; 09-11-2007 at 05:09 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Hey there, are you sure about those numbers 141 degrees celcius. I've read up on spores and found that even rare "Extreme Thermophile" spores can tolerate up to 105 degrees, and they only exist in volcanic regions of the planet like yellowstone or hawaii. Also the from what I know the flash point of beeswax is 250 degrees Celcius. I know that the melting point of wax is 140 Fahrenheit.

    Do you know where I can find the information you have?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    the best way to take care of AFB spores is fire, burn all that has been infected, just my 2 pennies worth
    Ted

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I see the fire argument as well as the scorching inside of the hive box argument. However, I'm considering converting to plastic frames seeings how they're landed at 2 dollars in some places and wood + wax foundations are almost the same price. But I can't exactly burn them, so I'm trying to figure out a lazymans approach to disinfection. We have a solar heater which gets hot enough to make the frames look like they've been in a toaster. So I'm trying to figure it it'll be hot enough to disinfect the hives.

    ----------

    Also, as a side note. I just started in this business, but my family has been doing it for over 300 years and my uncle who is now 74 and I will be inheriting all the equipment tells me of the "good ol days" when the inspector would drive by every spring and test the hives for us and if they found any disease he had a Ethylene-Oxide fumigator built right into his truck and he would setup and disinfect any equipment you had. (for free by the way - paid for by the govt). Then they stopped that and you had to take your hives to a depot to have them disinfected (also for free) and they stopped that. No you can't even get an inspector to show up at your farm unless you book an appointment, and if they find anything they just tell you to kill the hive and burn everything.

    And that was all done for free, when there was no income tax! All the media and papers are on a kick talking about how all the bees are getting wiped off the face of the planet. It's high time that people talk to their Ministers, congressman and senators to reinstate a state sponsored fumigation program for spore related diseases. that's my 2 cents

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icarusfx84 View Post
    It's high time that people talk to their Ministers, congressman and senators to reinstate a state sponsored fumigation program for spore related diseases. that's my 2 cents
    I commend you... that is a noble challenge. However, a very futile one in the lower 48 states I'm afraid. Here we have seen continued budget cuts and it is getting increasingly more difficult just to fund our basic local inspection services, let alone the type of program you are suggesting.

    I'm all for it, but do not see anything like that happening in the near future... unless of course the price of produce doubles due to lack of pollination services. Maybe then someone will listen.
    To everything there is a season....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icarusfx84 View Post
    We have a solar heater which gets hot enough to make the frames look like they've been in a toaster. So I'm trying to figure it it'll be hot enough to disinfect the hives.

    No, it isn't.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icarusfx84 View Post
    Hey there, are you sure about those numbers 141 degrees celcius. I've read up on spores and found that even rare "Extreme Thermophile" spores can tolerate up to 105 degrees, and they only exist in volcanic regions of the planet like yellowstone or hawaii. Also the from what I know the flash point of beeswax is 250 degrees Celcius. I know that the melting point of wax is 140 Fahrenheit.

    Do you know where I can find the information you have?
    The temperature/times/pressure relationships are published in numerous microbiology, surgery and laboratory manuals and the original literature probably goes back before the turn of the 20th century. The flashpoint figure is from memory, and may be wrong, but I looked it up when autoclaving some bee diet (CRC Manual, beeswax). 250 C is about 482 F. This seems high but is within reason.

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