Weird questions about beeswax...
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
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    174

    Default Weird questions about beeswax...

    I read where it takes approxmately 8 lbs of honey to make 1lb of wax. OK, interesting enough. Does that also mean that wax - like honey....

    1. Is digestible by humans?
    2. Has calories and food value?

    I told you they were weird questions. I guess I'm wondering if beeswax is just transformed nectar and pollen, just like honey. And if so, then the answer to both questions would be yes.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
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    Default

    If I remember correctly, no and no. It just passes through.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    New Braunfels, TX
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    Default

    Bees of a certain age produce wax from special glands located in their abdomens. To produce the wax, the bees must consume a certain amount of honey for the raw materials needed for their bodies to produce the wax. I think of it sort of like ear wax. Our bodies produce ear wax for a specific purpose. I suggest that the wax has no nutritional value or calories. Some niche honey producers add wax cappings (or at least do not filter the cappings) to their product, calling it really raw honey. Some in the health food camp believe that the wax in honey has medicinal or special properties. Who am I to argue with what sells.
    Hobbyist

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
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    220

    Default

    I don't think wax is digestible but rather acts as fiber in the digestive track. IMO
    Bee just and just bee

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
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    Default

    Beeswax does have calories. Because it's mostly lipids, it is very energy rich. That's one reason why it's so expensive for the bees to produce it and why it burns. It's really hard to find the energy content of beeswax on the internet for some reason, but I found a chemistry book that listed it as having 12.7 kcal/g (for a comparison, honey has about 3.1 kcal/g and paraffin wax has about 9.9 kcal/g).

    Beeswax is "transformed" nectar but the bees transform the carbohydrates into lipids so it is entirely different from honey. (Much like we can produce prodigious quantities of fat from the HFCS in soda...)

    However, as you suspected, beeswax is not digestible by humans, so the only way we can access the energy is by lighting a candle.

    The honeyguides in Africa are able to digest wax with high efficiency (97%)(Downs et al. 2002; they also give similar energy contents for wax) and apparently specialize on eathing beeswax (enough to invade Catholic churches and eat the candles).

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
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    528

    Default

    [The honeyguides in Africa are able to digest wax with high efficiency (97%)(Downs et al. 2002; they also give similar energy contents for wax) and apparently specialize on eathing beeswax (enough to invade Catholic churches and eat the candles).]

    Genesis 1:3 And god said, "Let there be light," ....

    and then cannibles came out of the jungle and ate his candles!

    What is the world coming to?

    -Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Posts
    165

    Exclamation

    Oh, sorry, I forgot to clarify: honeyguides are birds. They guide honey badgers, baboons, and sometimes people to honey bee nests they find, wait for the animal they guided to finish wreaking havoc on the nest and distracting the bees, and then they eat their fill.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    52,431

    Default

    >Does that also mean that wax - like honey....
    >1. Is digestible by humans?

    No.

    >2. Has calories and food value?

    No.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
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    1,523

    Default

    No! It is not digestible and can in fact cause an intestinal blockage (call poison control) if you eat enough of it. No! Don't eat it for fiber.

    It has the calories of what you leave in it when processing. Honey traces, etc.

    Etc. means things like slumgum is high in protein and in tests has really proved a good feed for chickens. More color and flavor in the yolks and stronger feathers.

    Human consumption should bee limited to very small amounts incidental to chewing the honey out.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Skull Valley, Az
    Posts
    284

    Default chewing gum

    Makes for some good jaw work outs. Flavor lasts a long time. Comb honey has been popular for so long a time. If it doesn't digest then it must have a weight control aspect.
    I've never had adverse effects swallowing wax........
    Happy
    BBZZZZZ

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