Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 73 of 73
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Exclamation Oh No!

    Kansas is doomed! We haven't had a bee inspector for over twenty years. How will we ever be able to keep bees?
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Plano, North Texas
    Posts
    318

    Default

    <Did you continue this practice after you "noticed that not all the piles of ashes were stared by us"? >

    Of course I did. I wasn't telling them the names of the beeks, nor the exact details. I am not, and was not a doctor or lawyer where confidentiality is guaranteed, and I felt good trying to help beekeepers, especially those in my county. I told them there were known AFB hives in a specific area, and they might want to avoid them. What they chose to do I never asked nor really wanted to know.

    I admit I am not surprised that some beeks took the law into their own hands. Those hives were a direct menace to their own operations. It is sad to see hives burn, but even more to see disease spreading and being unable to do anything about it. It would have been better if they had left the burning to me, because them buring = vandalism, while me burning = abatement.

    It was a clear case of one beek's freedom to leave bees to overwinter, coming into conflict with another's freedom to keep bees without loosing them due to somebody else's lack of keeping up with their own bees condition.

    Personally, I think we are loosing freedoms at an alarming rate as we try to trade freedom for security, and it is putting us in peril. But I also believe that you cannot allow every individual to do anything they want. For example, you can't allow people the freedom to drive the wrong way on the interstates. Getting back to the burning of hives, that became necessary when diseased bees were left out there - it's like driving the wrong way on the interstate. At that time, treating AFB with antibiotics was not legal, but we winked at it. If the beek had taken care to treat their hives; if they had culled diseased hives; if they had kept them at home; there wouldn't have been piles of ashes where they left their hives. The problem wasn't with inspections, it was with lazy or distracted beeks. The other beeks were cheering and that's why we had (and still have some) inspectors. And that's why I hate to see folks dis'ing inspections.
    "Before I speak, I have something I'd like to say. . . . I will try to keep this short as long as I can." Yogi Berra

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Auburn and Tri-Cities Washington
    Posts
    334

    Default

    “I personally donated the use of 50 hives mtself when I was inspecting for the use of experiments. That same year, several other inspectors I knew did the same. Not out of guilt, not out of pressure. But becuase those others, along with myself saw the need and importance in what was going on behind the scenes. And what goes on is a whole lot more than diminsihing the inspection programs to little more than afb checks and two minute visits.”

    I’m going out on a limb here but I am guessing the inspection program was not designed for donating hives for experiments. I applaud your sacrifice but I don’t see why this would be considered part of the inspector program. Research should be done in the area of beekeeping but not by the inspectors.

    “well, in our county, we've had 2 cases of afb all year. everyone with hives in the vicinity has been notified (so as to keep a careful watch). the infection near my hives would have festered and been neglected without treatment if not for the inspection. with 4 honey supers on this hive, there would be plenty to rob from a deadout...likely infecting a number of hives nearby (including mine).”

    The inspector program may help protect you from managed hives but it does not protect you from feral bees. You might have plenty of feral colonies with AFB in your area and the inspectors can’t protect you from that. If Naturebee is correct about the frequency of inspection of managed hives (once every 2 years) then how safe from others hives are you really?

    “I have only three hives [and don't know nothin bout beekeep'n] but was "honored" that the "state" inspector took the time to come out and just see what was going on with the hives.”

    If you want someone to teach you about beekeeping try a local club. Why does an inspector make you feel “honored?” Are you “honored” when the tax collector comes and takes your hard earned money only see them squandered on people who don’t or won’t work? Do you realize he just got paid by YOU and others to inspect three hives you could have had inspected for free from another local beek? If they were really looking out for the comercial beekeeping industry and the economic factors involved why would they waste time looking at three hives in a hobbyists backyard?

    “Kansas is doomed! We haven't had a bee inspector for over twenty years. How will we ever be able to keep bees?”

    Our state has also not had an inspection program for some time. In fact it was mostly stopped by the commercial beekeepers. Why would that be? They didn’t like paying for a service they felt did not serve their best interests. Registration fees for hives now go to research. Money much better spent in my opinion.
    Last edited by chief; 08-23-2007 at 07:27 PM.
    \"The man who sets out to carry a cat by its tail learns something that will always be useful and which never will grow dim or doubtful.\" - Mark Twain

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Cheif,
    "Research should be done in the area of beekeeping but not by the inspectors."

    What makes you make a statement in such a way? Is there some golden rule? Some guidelines or limitations? Why should inspectors not be involved? You mention what happened in your state, and that certainly was not the answer.

    Data collection and research is tied to many inspector programs. Not just here but in many states. When (Penn State or other) researchers need to collect data for analyzing, they often ask inspectors for assistance. It gives a broad picture from thousands of hives and allows data collection to be on a scale not achievable without inspectors and state programs taking part.

    I know when Penn State and Sare grant people need large amounts of hives, it was normal to ask inspectors first if they wanted to participate. That participation always involved donating hives. And it always involved the inspectors collecting the data and charging the time to the inspection program.

    I have previously said that the inspection program did not start out for anything more than afb checks, etc. But certainly today, it is much more than that.

    The inspection part of the program may be the justification funding, but it certainly involves more than two minute checks for afb. Beekeepers have sought the state apiarist and the help of the inspectors for a host of things. And without the inspection program, the state apiarist has no job.

    Its nice having inspectors work directly for the state agriculture secretary. Its high visability. Having this type support helps when a beekeeper needs help with twonship zoning issues, among other things.

    State inspectors give talks and give educational demonstrations at many county clubs. The state apiarist, with the data collected over the year, always makes a year end presentation.

    But what is the cost for inspections no matter whether you have a hundred or a thousand hives, the cost for certificates for those leaving the state with bees, assistance at a phone call away anytime you need it, or anything else the inspection program and the state apiarist provide......a whole 5 dollars per year.

    I think for everything I get with the state inspection program, I can deal with a quick glance in my hives once every two years or so. I see many benefits from having a state program. I see it at county meetings. I see it in the data they collect. I see it in so many ways.

    I know that the state is active with educating the local communities and if and when ahb become a problem, having an inspection program will certainly help in many areas.

    Sorry to hear chief, that as state, nobody could work together or find beneficial programs that beekeepers could enjoy.

    Here, the state inspectors along with the state apiarist, work closely with Penn State, the state bee association, many county and local clubs, etc.
    Last edited by BjornBee; 08-24-2007 at 04:33 AM.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,735

    Default

    There's no fee in Massachusetts for registering so getting on the list isn't really donating to the state. However, maybe some of you current or ex-inspectors know the answer to this. Does the state keep records, in a database, of the hives they visited and the results that they found? If so, is that useful to them? Can it be accessed by the rest of us? If inspectors provide such data, would volunteer beekeepers performing the duties of the inspectors provide data that is as valuable?
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Ravenseye,
    Yes its useful.

    The inspection program here just didn't look for afb. It takes data on mites counts, positioning of the hives, shade versus sun desease impacts, collects data on mite levels compared to the different treatments beekeepers used. Last year they took massive collection of randon weight and wing samples for use ahb identification and possible use of a databank later. These are just some of the ways that inspectors and the state program assistas university and other agencies with data collection.

    The inspection reports are not open to the public. In fact as an inspector, you could lose your job if you disclosed personal information, even notifying another beekeeper of a neighbor with afb.
    But the state puts that data together in the form of reports, and it assists with many research projects.

    The problem with public input on a larger scale is the different methods of collection and sometimes the equipment needed for collection.

    The data base of information on the state level is only vauable if the inspectors collect more then simple looks at afb. At least here they do. And that information helps in many ways, behind the scenes, without much fanfare from those so inconvenienced by a hive inspection.

    I'm glad you asked the questions.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Hancock County, TN
    Posts
    82

    Default

    As a current inspector in TN. I submit a detailed report on a form that the state gives us.It goes to the state apiarist and is filed with the agriculture dept. From my understanding the info is available to anyone willing to take the time to access it. Don't know if it available on-line as of yet but will check with him by email and get back to you on that.
    The info is currently being used by the universities around the state to see where the apiaries are located and how many are located in areas around the state.
    As far as volunteer beekeepers doing inspections and reporting on them I would be a little Leary about that happening unless they were to take classes and be certified to do the job. Here in TN. the state holds such classes once a year all around the state so not that hard to get certified. If someone is willing to take the time to go to classes in the evening at their own expense for a week and then take the time and expense to travel all around different counties going to check other peoples hives without being compensated for this more power to them.
    We receive a small amount of money from the state for doing this service that has been cut back every year so not much incentive to do it except for the love of bee and their environment. And trying to educate the beekeepers on keeping their bees healthy.
    Sideline beekeeper /State Certified Inspector
    Bee Friends CO-OP

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,526

    Default

    “well, in our county, we've had 2 cases of afb all year. everyone with hives in the vicinity has been notified (so as to keep a careful watch). the infection near my hives would have festered and been neglected without treatment if not for the inspection. with 4 honey supers on this hive, there would be plenty to rob from a deadout...likely infecting a number of hives nearby (including mine).”

    The inspector program may help protect you from managed hives but it does not protect you from feral bees. You might have plenty of feral colonies with AFB in your area and the inspectors can’t protect you from that.

    >>>the particular hive with afb that i was referring to was medicated in the past...and the symptoms were somewhat "supressed", but visibly present. add to that equation the 3-4 honey supers, lack of bottom board, and "about to fall over", and what you have is not equivileant to a feral colony with afb. a feral colony would (in most cases) not have such a large (and hard to defend) entrance, would generally not be about to fall over (although i'm sure it does happen), and most importantly, would have died out long ago without being treated...would not have so many stores, and would be open for wax moths to take over and consume the stores (greatly limiting the spread). feral colonies with afb DIE, they do not limp along with enough medication to keep them alive, weak, and ripe for robbing. given that there has not been afb reported in this area in the last few years (i don't have full data on this, but it is my impression from the inspector), and given that this hive was MOVED about a mile from my hives in order to keep it TENS OF MILES FROM THE OWNERS UNINFECTED HIVES (which i know for a fact), it seems pretty darn clear that ferals in the area are not infected in any significant numbers....but they might get infected from THIS hive.

    If Naturebee is correct about the frequency of inspection of managed hives (once every 2 years) then how safe from others hives are you really?

    >>>naturebee is undoubtedly correct about frequency of inspection IN HIS AREA. in our county, all hives are inspected once a year....and with 2 cases of AFB out of about 1200 hives, i can say that in our area, with our inspection program (and my own dilligent inspections of my own hives), that my hives are relatively safe....with the exception of this particular hive that i am darn happy got inspected.

    >>>deknow

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,083

    Default

    Bjorn,
    Ordinance problems? What do you mean by ordinance?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,735

    Default

    Thanks Bjorn,

    I really don't want to know about specific colonies but I'd be pretty interested in statewide trends or even county statistics. I'd love to compare what my historical experience has been compared to what inspectors are seeing. There's got to be a HUGE benefit to seeing hundreds of hives, across a specific area, on a seasonal basis. I would think that leaving the data collection to the general public might create enough inconsistency to render it suspect. Of course, the same could happen in a structured inspection scenario but at least it's in a potentially more controlled situation. Kind of like taking a census. Not perfect, but representative.

    Thanks!
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    sqkcrk,
    Ordances. Township, zoning issues, that sort of stuff.

    Its much more powerful to approach a township that have complaints and perhaps pending proposals limiting or banning beekeeping, when state officials from the department of agriculture get involved. We can show proactive "best beekeeping practices" with state support, and why having managed colonies are beneficial for so many reasons. Bottom line is that beekeepers here have support for such matters. The beekeeper is not left alone to fight city hall so to speak.
    Last edited by BjornBee; 08-24-2007 at 06:27 PM.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    As I was driving around today, I was thinking of the many ways that inspectors and the inspection program help the beekeeping community. I already mentioned a few. But some I missed.....

    One of the more visible public things I did was take calls from county 911 dispatch. Last year, I was called on Memorial day concerning a large swarm that had gathered in the middle of a cemetery just prior to services. Since they had a bucket truck to hang signs and tidy up the park, on site, getting the swarm from the tree branch was not problem. I am sure many good words were spoken by the people attending the services.

    The other thing I greatly enjoyed was giving talks to homeschool groups.

    Dennis V. in charge of the Pennsylvania inspection program has always encouraged the inspectors to be highly visible, and allowed them to do this type of work. Its good for beekeepers, good for the inspection program, and good for the state.

    Yes, he set goals. And he expected the majority of time to be devoted to inspecting. But whether it was attending the Africnized Honey Bee PA. training seminar at PennState, or representing the state at a bee club social, he knew the benefits of such matters.

    I completely enjoyed the side benefits and opportunities that Dennis gave me. I am appreciative of the way the program runs. I can only hope this can continue. Everyone benefits.
    Last edited by BjornBee; 08-25-2007 at 06:34 AM.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Smile

    Your message prompted me to contact our state bee inspector. He is coming out next week.
    I was just lucky enough that he was free the day I had planned to skip work.

    Thanks!

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads