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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    dekalb,alabama,USA
    Posts
    80

    Default what causes shriveled wings

    this is why it is usually important to treat during breaks in the brood cycle before the bees begin to raise brood again, if you have bees which will not eliminate the most of the mites during the break because of their grooming behavior. the overload factor does as bjorn stated play a major role here and i believe this factor is more responsible for the eventual demise of the colony than the original infestation of mites. this is when you have a maximum no of mites relative to the brood being fed and this is when the viral infection threshold is reached. if you have noticed a hive can have a large no of mites without any apparent problems during the early part of the season and then later in the year after the summer break in brood rearing the fall bees seem to show up with the viruses and then the colony crashes. it is also the reason that late in the year you can have persistant viral infections and will not see many mites so the relationship does not appear to be directly related to the no of mites visible. so that is why it is so important to treat then if you have to your treatments are more effective than at any other time. also i believe that once a certain threshold is reached the viruses can be passed on when the bees eat out damaged larvae and feed some of this to uninfected brood.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Default

    >>>>Did I make any sense?<<<

    You made a lot of sense!

    Dickm

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Thanks Dickm,

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Default

    >Did I make any sense?

    I see some once in a while and had not thought about why or the timing of it. I will pay more attention to the timing now and see if it correlates with breaks in the brood cycle.

    Thanks.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Windsor,NC,USA
    Posts
    285

    Default

    I follow the reasoning for the mite overload. I maybe then should have treated this swarm as soon as they had started making comb after I captured them. That was a major break in the brood cycle and the only mites would have been the ones on the bees themselves. They have been very slow in making comb. I have also fed sugar syrup continuously over the summer. What other factors will cause a break in the brood cycle? Beyond the obvious losing a queen, what else?
    Now for something slightly different; I have noticed by doing these sticky board mite counts, that there is alot of pollen, wax, bees parts, ect that accumalate on the sticky board in a 24hr period. This being below the screen where the bees cannot get rid of it. It would seem to me that this would act as a lure for SHB and Wax moths,YJs, as well as ants. If the same material would normally fall out of the screen and below the hive, it would still atract these pests.So then it would seem a solid bottom board would be better for this case as it would allow the bees to carry out ( maybe to some distance) this debris and also contain the smell of it more inside the hive. I had considered leaving the sticky board under the hive over the winter , to help insulate the hive from a cold draft. Now I think it would be better to slide it inside the hive ON TOP OF the screen, IF it is left on at all.This would allow the bees to carry the stuff out. I think the bees would be fine without the sticky board, but I think closing it up might still serve some purpose. I understand the importance of good ventilation. Any thoughts on this?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    yoyo,
    wax and other accumulations may facilitate a place for wax moth to feed etc, but it attracts no more than what the normal smell of the hive would anyways.

    If you want to see wax moths in action, go out just after sundown. Say 20 minutes after dark. Use a flashlight, and you will be amazed at the number of moths that are on the outside of the hive looking for entry. A cool night seems to have many moths in this manner.

    As for SHB, it has found that alarm pheromone itself (given off when you open a hive, a hive is under attack, or stressed, etc.) will attract beetles from miles away. I have always scoffed at the suggestion that shb will be more attracted to a hive for the mere dropping of some comb.

    I'm not one to suggest that apairiy cleanliness is not worth the effort. But it does not impact whether wax moths and shb find and impact your hives. Your bees will either keep them in check or not.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Windsor,NC,USA
    Posts
    285

    Default

    I am going out there tonight and see whats flying around. Thanks for that tidbit. I have bee catching a few of them in a plastic drink bottle with some orange juice. I tried to catch YJs with it, but it seems more effective on moths.

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