Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Question Fertilized or unfertilized egg

    Hi all,
    I want to ask you a question. Last Sunday it was the first time when I ask myself about this looking for the answer but not find. How the queen know that the cell itís a drone cell and put unfertilized egg or itís worker cell and lay fertilized egg. Please be so kind and help me.
    George

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drone1952 View Post
    Hi all,
    I want to ask you a question. Last Sunday it was the first time when I ask myself about this looking for the answer but not find. How the queen know that the cell it’s a drone cell and put unfertilized egg or it’s worker cell and lay fertilized egg. Please be so kind and help me.
    George
    My understanding (and I may be wrong) is that she measures the cell size with her antennae before laying the egg.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    S√£o Paulo State, Brazil
    Posts
    55

    Default

    I was told by a professor of USP (Universidade de S„o Paulo - University of S„o Paulo) that the queen measures the cell size with its hairy forelegs

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Laurel, MS
    Posts
    1,026

    Default

    Bet that is a cute little tape measure she uses.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default

    >How the queen know that the cell itís a drone cell and put unfertilized egg or itís worker cell and lay fertilized egg. Please be so kind and help me.

    Front legs.

    "The mated queen can lay an egg, which becomes a drone, or add sperm to the egg to produce a worker - if the fertilised egg is reared in a queen cell and fed copiously, a queen is produced. The queen determines the type of cell by measuring with her front legs - worker cells are smaller than drone cells."

    http://www.bbka.org.uk/articles/life..._mellifera.php
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    726

    Default

    That said, there was one professor in my II class last year who did research on this topic (I'd have to look up his name if anyone is interested). He found if you give a queen drone cells only, she will lay fertilized eggs that will mature into normal workers in a certain percentage of them. So while the size of the cell seems to be a big cue, it's not the only thing.

    -Tim

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Craiova, Romania
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Hi everybody!

    If the front legs are responsable for deciding what the egg will become, why
    queens that miss one of their front legs lay eggs perfectly normal? They won't lay as many eggs, but will lay normal.

    I mean, the brood will have the same percentage (the proportion between workers and drones) as the one of a normal queen. Differences are only about the amount of bees, not the proportion between bees and drones...
    60% Expert American/English Speaker

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Craiova, Romania
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Nobody can say something about this common situation or haven't you met such situations?
    60% Expert American/English Speaker

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    798

    Default

    If it is all done by front legs measuring the cell size, why do I see drone cells at times in HSC (all cells the same size)? Also the queen cups are even larger so why do they get a fertilized egg? Seems to me that she may bee a little smarter than the size of her legs!!
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads