Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Cheesecake

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Agra, OK USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Cheesecake

    Thinking about entering in the county fair, they have a cheesecake division but it has to be an "original" recipe. . . So I've been playing w/ a recipe on paper, tell me if this sounds any good. I'm going to pick up the stuff tomorrow to make it and see how it goes. . .
    Praline Cheesecake
    I have my great great aunts praline recipe I'd like to use for a crust and then do a traditional style cheesecake w/ small chopped pralines on the top
    OR
    A nut crust w/ traditional cheesecake and small chunks of pralines baked in the cake.

    Any and all suggestions would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
    Posts
    696

    Default

    I make a white chocolate raspberry swirl cheesecake that has ground almonds and ground vanilla wafers for crust, it's wonderful (but not an 'original' recipe, it's from Good Housekeeping from around 1996 or so). 28 vanilla wafers, 1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds, grind together to fine crumbs in a food processor, put it in the springform pan and mix in 2 tablespoons sugar. Then blend in 3 tablespoons melted butter and press the mixture onto the bottom of the pan.

    However, I have to say I do like the idea of the praline crust and pralines mixed into the body. Sounds delish!
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,985

    Default

    don't know what kind of nut you are considering but...

    almost any dish that requires pecans can be greatly inhanced by slightly toasting the pecans (you will need to add a small quantity of butter to prevent sticking)... I think it adds quite a bit to the texture (the nuts retain a crisp nature) plus it enhances the nut flavor. of course (if obtainable) native pecans are ALWAYS preferred in candy and cake making over the steriod nuts most people buy at the grocery store.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Agra, OK USA
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    don't know what kind of nut you are considering but...

    almost any dish that requires pecans can be greatly inhanced by slightly toasting the pecans (you will need to add a small quantity of butter to prevent sticking)... I think it adds quite a bit to the texture (the nuts retain a crisp nature) plus it enhances the nut flavor. of course (if obtainable) native pecans are ALWAYS preferred in candy and cake making over the steriod nuts most people buy at the grocery store.
    That's a good idea! The recipe calls for pecans and I have some from last year in the freezer, they are paper shells I think, they are local so they ARE better than store bought!
    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    white chocolate raspberry swirl cheesecake
    YUMMY! That sounds very good! But anything that has chocolate and cheesecake in the same title sounds good to me!!!!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Default

    You should send it to me and I will test it for you free! And give you a totally unbiased opinion.

    Cheesecake! MMMMMM Cheesecake!
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Default

    I also have a Cranberry Swirl recipe that came out of Southern Living magazine in the 90's. This recipe uses Pepperidge Farm's Bourdeaux cookies. You take a couple of bags of those cookies, crush them and add butter. It's a really nice recipe.

    They also give variations which I thought was interesting.....

    One was to use Pecan Shortbread cookies - Pecan Sandies. The recipe calls for 2-1/4 cups of crushed cookies with 1/4 cup melted butter. This is for a 9" cheesecake.

    Other variations were cinnamon graham crackers, vanilla wafers, round buttery Ritz crackers, thin pretzels sticks, Teddy bear shaped chocolate cookies, or chocolate graham crackers.

    I have another crust recipe that I use. You take 1 cup melted butter, 1 cup of chopped pecans and 2 cups of all purpose flour. Mix together and form on the bottom of your pan. Bake at 350 for 15 mins. This could be used for a cold cheesecake recipe. It's very bland tasting, but buttery and good..no sugar is added, but could be if you wanted it to be. Brown sugar might be a nice variation.
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Default

    The thing about cheesecake at fairs are that they are looking for NO cracked tops. The judges are looking for a creamy cheesecake versus a dense cheesecake that breaks up when cutting.

    Most cheesecakes really miss the boat. Natually, a cheesecake is a very heavy dessert... nice and creamy. However, if you add the right things to it, those right things can cut through the fat and creamness and offer a very very nice ballance to the dessert.

    I have entered a lot of fairs with cheesecake entries and also have judged a good number of them too. If you need any further assistance, feel free to ask.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Agra, OK USA
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    The thing about cheesecake at fairs are that they are looking for NO cracked tops. The judges are looking for a creamy cheesecake versus a dense cheesecake that breaks up when cutting.

    Most cheesecakes really miss the boat. Natually, a cheesecake is a very heavy dessert... nice and creamy. However, if you add the right things to it, those right things can cut through the fat and creamness and offer a very very nice ballance to the dessert.

    I have entered a lot of fairs with cheesecake entries and also have judged a good number of them too. If you need any further assistance, feel free to ask.
    Would you recommend cooking a cheesecake in a hot water bath? I went to a class at the vo-tech a few months ago and the lady recommended that but her cheese cakes still didn't seem to turn out as good as I expected. I've made several cheesecakes and thankfully haven't had a cracking problem (knock on wood). . .

    I was thinking about the recipe on the way to work this morning and wondered if the pralines would make a very good bottom, I like cooked cheesecake and I don't know how it'd hold up to oven baking. . . . Any ideas? I am going to play w/ it tonight and see, I will post results!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Warne, North Carolina
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Hey Chef,

    I was always taught that the secret to getting your cheesecake NOT to crack, was by allowing it to cool down in a warm oven.

    To do this, for an average cheesecake recipe, you bake your (9") cheesecake at 350 for 15 minutes, then reduce temperature to 225, and bake for about an hour and 10 mins. Remove from oven and run a knife around the sides of cheesecake to loosen it from the pan. Turn the oven off; return cheesecake to the oven, and let it cool in oven for 1 hour. Remove from oven; let cool completely in the pan on a wire rack. Chill, uncovered, until ready to serve. (Cheesecake will continue to firm up as it chills.)
    ~What do you know there's so much to be done
    Count all the bees in the hive, Chase all the clouds from the sky~

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Chef Isaac, I must have unrefined taste, because my fave cheesecakes are the ones that are heavy and a little on the dry side

    My favorite is cheesecake with a graham cracker crust, a hint of amaretto and the mini dark chocolate chips scattered throughout, then a thin layer of chocolate fudge topping. Can't find them anymore.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Posts
    2,030

    Default

    You guys are making me hungry...
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Default

    Most cheesecakes really miss the boat. Naturally, a cheesecake is a very heavy dessert... nice and creamy. However, if you add the right things to it, those right things can cut through the fat and creaminess and offer a very very nice balance to the dessert.

    I have entered a lot of fairs with cheesecake entries and also have judged a good number of them too. If you need any further assistance, feel free to ask.[/QUOTE]

    Hey Chef!
    AAhhhh me me pick me! I need to know what a cheesecake is supposed to taste like can you send me one of yours?
    Just kidding!

    Best one I have had was in a steak house called "Saltgrass Steak House"
    In Dallas Texas. It was 5.95 a big slice Texas size and worth it to me!
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Agra, OK USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Results

    1st one - Praline crust w/ plain filling - As I was afraid the crust was a stick mess, good but a mess to eat. So it won't work

    2nd one - Nut crust w/ plain filling and crumbled pralines on top. The crust was very good filling not bad, I hope after it sets longer it'll firm up more. . . I put it in the frig about 11 last night and ate a sliver about 630 this morning so I'm hoping it just hasn't had time to set up. . .

    So, I think I'll keep the nut crust and see if the filling sets up better and then try it again.

    Hey Chef, from your experience do you think the filling needs some "pazzaz" or does just a plain filling catch attention better? What do the judges like?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Default

    For me, I really like a nice balance. Take, for example, a plain vanilla cheesecake. It nees something... we are in the height of summer so I might use a nice apricot or berry glaze of it. A nice fidge layer is always neat.

    I think it is all about balance.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads