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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    ozarks
    Posts
    41

    Default comb collapse disorder

    Went to look at my hive today to see if the third super was full yet. it is drawn and filled and capped , finally in my third year, I have enough honey to eat some myself.... sweet!,, literally
    when I pulled a frame of capped honey (This one was cut comb foundation), there must have been some burr comb attachment to the frame next. it sort of collapsed and mangled about half the comb of wireless foundation. I put it back in ,added a fourth super and closed it up.
    my Question is will the bees straighten out the mess where the comb was pulled apart ? or should I have removed and replaced this frame?
    andy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Default

    They'll repair it, just might not be the way you would like them too.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    They will repair it, using the adjoining frames for support. You need to get it out asap. Pull it and the one next to it together and replace them with two empties. Separate the empties with a drawn frame so they will not build one wide and one narrow.

    If the super is fully capped, just harvest the whole super.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,739

    Default

    I'd harvest it. You can crush and strain if it's too mangled to do comb honey.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,779

    Default

    I tried that already (putting it back in). They did repair it, but it was a sight to behold. Essentially, their repair involved adding wax to the damaged frame which "bumped" a section of it way out while modifying the adjoining frame so that the new "bump" would fit. On top of that, they then decided that the repair would be good for drone brood. I ended up pulling both frames, since they were kind of locked together like Lego's, tossing the drone brood and harvesting the honey by crushing and straining. Actually got almost 4 pounds so it wasn't a total loss. Last I looked, the new foundation was almost all pulled.

    I'd get in there and yank it.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,887

    Default

    When ever I fix something improperly I call it bee rigging
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

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