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Thread: Whoops

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default Whoops

    I went to pull my super today, what a disaster.

    First off I tried one of those bee escape things that pops into a inner cover, I wont use it again. I get out to the hive and the thing is buzzing, not in a good way either. I'm not sure if I seperated the queen from the rest of the hive or what but they were not happy.

    I pull the super and look at what I thought was all capped honey, only to find some brood mixed in the very bottom of 6 frames. I changed my game plan, put a queen excluder on the hive and set the super back on top (making sure the queen wasn't up there).

    I'll let them be for a while, let the brood hatch and then take the whole super.

    I feel like a real rookie right now. Did I do the right thing leaving the super to let the brood hatch and hopefully they will cap the rest of the honey?

    K

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,285

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kopeck View Post
    Did I do the right thing leaving the super to let the brood hatch and hopefully they will cap the rest of the honey?
    K
    Excellent choice. I believe that even those who do not typically use queen excluders would agree, that in a case like this, it makes some sense.
    To everything there is a season....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

    Default

    Just depends on what kind of brood it is. If it's drone brood, i'd pull it, makes for nice varroa control. If it's all worker, then i'd leave it until it's hatched and the cells filled and capped.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Default

    I've never had any luck with the porter bee escapes (the kind that go in the inner cover hole). I like the triangular ones from Brushy Mt. or Betterbee. The bees won't abandon brood, so if there are still a lot of bees in them 24 hours later there is probably some brood.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Thanks guys. It was quiet unnerving when I went out to the hive and could hear it from 15 feet away and saw all those bees hanging all over the front, well it's not the best way to start the day.

    I just checked them and they seem quiet happy now. I did the little put your ear up to the hive and tap trick and got a quick increase in "buzz" and then an admedit calm down. I've been told that's a quick way to test for a happy, queen right hive.

    Oh, yeah, and it was mostly workers with a few drones mixed in.

    Makes me happy to hear that my line of thought wasn't to far out in right field.

    K

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