Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default quail sitting on barbed wire fence

    I have noticed twice this week a single quail setting up on branch and today one setting on a top strand of a barbed wire fence. I have never seen this before the first strucks me as odd. I didnt know quail to perch them selves off the ground has anyone seen this before and no they wasnt meadowlarks city people I have been told have shot them for quail. or so the old urban legend about the city folk and the game warden catching them with a trunk load of meadow larks goes

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    I haven't ever seen a quail (Bobwhite) that wasn't running on the ground, setting in cover, or flying. Never knew them to perch, either.

    They used to be very plentiful. I used to hunt them as a kid in Indiana. But I haven't seen them at all for years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    "They used to be very plentiful". BerkeyDavid. Yes they were; around here too. It was the first bird I heard when my Dad drove us out to the abandoned apple orchard he bought 53 years ago. It amazes me how we have so many wild turkeys here now. They [WI. natural resources] introduced them about 30 years ago from Missouri I guess. Before that we only had a few for many years in small flocks. I don't know if they have tried to get some genetic diversity in the mix with birds [Bobwhite] from other states. It's been a long time since I have heard a Bobwhite let alone seen one so I don't know anything about "perching" quail.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    S.E. Oklahoma
    Posts
    337

    Default

    I had rarely seen a bobwhite off the ground until I began raising them. My pen birds always seem to attract a few lovesick males who didn't find a mate. They will fly in and perch on the house, in the trees, on the barn etc..My thought is that they are torn between the desire for a mate and the instinct to avoid people and pets.

    David

  5. #5

    Default

    I have a small covey that frequent the hen house, looking for some stray scratch feed. They hop up on the bee hives that are next to the hen house, and then jump through the chicken fence, eat, then leave. They are fun to watch sneaking through the backyard

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    David, I don't know about up in your area, but the fireants have killed out alot of the quail down here. They reportedly kill the babies when they are hatching out. We used to have quail on our place, and I heard what sounded like a few of them earlier this Summer, but I haven't seen any for probably at least 10 years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonfly View Post
    David, I don't know about up in your area, but the fireants have killed out alot of the quail down here. They reportedly kill the babies when they are hatching out. We used to have quail on our place, and I heard what sounded like a few of them earlier this Summer, but I haven't seen any for probably at least 10 years.
    we don't have fireants. I have heard that they died off because of the loss of habitat (no more fence rows) and severe winters. WHen I used to hunt them I would just walk along the fence rows and up they would fly (in thhe winter). WHen y ou would dress them they would be full of corn.

    Others claim that the newer combines are so much better that there isn't as much corn left inthe field. I don't know about that, I still see lots of other birds going for the left over corn.

    I think it is the loss of fence row habitat.

    Yes the wild turkeys are showing up around hhere too.

    I sure wish I could hear bobwhites again. The only time I hear their call is when I whistle it myself (which I love to do )

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    i have abundant quail here and and they roost high in the oaks. when the covey is forageing they will often have a look out perched high on a branch or rock out cropping.
    the quail here have top knots on both sexes. i think that is the native variety. when i was in the valley just the males had top knots. i bet the natives where wiped out of that area of the valley and reintroduced with a non native.
    i'm having a terrible time with the quail eating my new shoots. it's seasonal. they only bother the crops in the dry season.
    if anyone has ideas for quail control i'd be interested
    all that is gold does not glitter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Default

    >if anyone has ideas for quail control i'd be interested
    __________________

    The three hardest things on quail here are the hard icy winters, coyotes, and bobcats. We call them and our wild turkeys yardbirds. Out in the field they are fair game, in the yard they are out of bounds and protected.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    Stan, quail is absolutely delicious to eat, but is a regulated game animal, at least here in Texas. What are your game laws? Are you in an area where you can shoot? Certain birds here can be shot if they are a "pest" to crops, but I doubt quail is one of those. Check your local game laws, and if you have an aversion to killing your own meat, there's very likely someone you know who is not.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    The three hardest things on quail here are the hard icy winters, coyotes, and bobcats. We call them and our wild turkeys yardbirds. Out in the field they are fair game, in the yard they are out of bounds and protected.[/QUOTE]

    we have coyotes and bobcats even mountain lion. saw a bobcat this past sunday night. since i do all my market gardening right in the yard i'd say i look at it oppasite. out in the field they are out of bounds and protected, in the yard they are fair game.
    thanks for the info dragonfly. i'm not against shooting but the attraction of water around here is too strong. if i alliminated one covey another would move in. i have 1x4 and 2x4 runners covered with 1" chicken wire i shuffle around till the greens get a few inches tall, then they leave them alone.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    stangardener: Those quail in the southwest are probably called Gambles quail; with the top-knots. I hope to see one someday. You would think that with are more mild winters [here] they would be more plentiful. Not enough habitat I guess.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Pearisburg,VA
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Probably the wild turkeys tearing up the quail nests and eating their eggs. The more wild turkeys you have then the less quail. Also some of the salt that is put on roads in winter is eaten by the quail, then it kills them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads