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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Arrow What are these flowers?

    No trick questions. I planted these a few years back and have no idea what they are. I am trying to see what blooms when, and these seem to bloom at a good time of the year.

    http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...ictures015.jpg

    http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...ictures016.jpg

    Both pictures are the same plant.

    Anyone?? I know its common. Just not sure. Thanks.

    I think I'll be seeing about a better camera with a better zoom.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BjornBee View Post
    No trick questions. I planted these a few years back and have no idea what they are. I am trying to see what blooms when, and these seem to bloom at a good time of the year.

    http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...ictures015.jpg

    http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...ictures016.jpg

    Both pictures are the same plant.

    Anyone?? I know its common. Just not sure. Thanks.

    I think I'll be seeing about a better camera with a better zoom.
    I don't know what the plant is called but I have alot of it...

    I think it may be a mint plant of some type but not sure. Whenever its in bloom they start putting a dark honey in the comb.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Looks like mint to me

    I took some photos of bees on my mint. see if it looks the same.

    www.williamandlea.com
    We do custom designs... If it is printed we can design it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Southern Delaware
    Posts
    69

    Default

    I believe it is a species of nepeta (catmint). Bumblebees love the stuff as do honeybees. Anymore queens coming Mike? Thanks Madison...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    Mint? Question is, which one

    The mint family has about 3000 species.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Southern Delaware
    Posts
    69

    Smile

    Right you are Dave, the scientific name/family is Agastache foeniculum. Anise-Hyssop or Anise Mint. I also forgot to mention that hummingbirds love the stuff. Madison.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Way to check to see if it is in the mint family is to check the stem. Many members of the mint family (Lamiaceae), are square in cross section.

    Like Mad68 says, probably Agastache foeniculum. Hard to see in your pictures, though.

    Better image http://www.gardenerspath.com/plantgu...isehyssop.html

    Is that it?

    MM

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    This is a good one. I too think it is agastache. ALthough it is also very similar to a wild mint that I always just call "mint." I am trying to find the L name of the mint.

    I went out this morning to try to tell them apart. The mint is almost done blooming but the agastache is still coming on strong.

    The mint leave, when crushed, has more moisture in it and of course smells like mint. The leaf is a little rounder, but identically arranged in groups of 2.

    The agastache leaf is a little thinner and smells like anise when crushed.

    Also the flower columns on the mint are more pyramidal and the agastache is more columnar.

    How about a new category where we have a plant of the week to identify and discuss? THere are so many out there that we take for granted. Like the mint. I will try to find out a better i.d. on the mint. It is not in my northeast weed book. My medicinal plant book has 5 different mints but no clear pics to use to id.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    707

    Default

    The mint family has 76 genera, and as previously stated thousands of species. The picture is definately a mint. It is in the genus Mentha. I believe the species is spicata.

    Mentha spicata is commonly called spearmint.

    The name is also synonymous with Mentha cordifolia, Mentha longifolia, Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds. var. undulata (Willd.), Mentha spicata L. var. longifolia L., or Mentha spicata L. var. spicata.

    Gotta love taxonomy!

    BTW- mints do hybridize freely, so there can be quite a lot of variation in appearance.
    Last edited by Walliebee; 07-19-2007 at 10:33 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    I planted some a few years back also, they probably are like mine which is a peppermint or also called a sweet mint, they will come up ever where, if you mow them they want grow but if you leave them alone they will grow everywhere.
    Last edited by TwT; 07-20-2007 at 07:19 AM.
    Ted

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