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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Default Too much filtering or seive only?

    I've read posts about how to use filters and whether to stack them or not. Is this to stop pollen also from getting in the final jar/container? I used pantyhose last fall and seemed to get a real good honey. Do the filters just take out wax, dirt and various bee parts that were left behind? I don't want to lose the pollen. Is a seive better for this or will the 200-600 micron filters leave it in also?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sparkill, NY
    Posts
    110

    Default

    I hope you get some good responses on this question. I am new and am going to be filtering shortly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Madison Heights VA
    Posts
    396

    Default

    If there is any pollen, it will have been disolved into the honey. The filters are to get any wax cappings, body parts or other things left over from the extracting.
    Curtis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Default

    There is always wax and bee parts that need to be filtered. After that it depends on your market and what you want. If you use a filter fine enough to get all the pollen out, then your honey will crystallize much more slowly. I like the pollen particles in the honey and my customers tend to like "raw, unfiltered honey", which to them means it's never been heated and only coarsely filtered.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by notaclue View Post
    200-600 micron filters
    I you're relying on gravity, honey will flow through the 600 micron filter pretty easily, but I've found the 200 micron filter is very slow unless the honey is quite warm.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Posts
    165

    Default

    "The Hive and Honey Bee" says pollen size ranges from 5-200 microns. Wikipedia says the smallest pollen is 6 microns. The following website states that pollen size ranges from 10-100 microns.
    http://www.dmi.dk/eng/index/research...t/pollen-4.htm

    A 200 micron filter should not filter out much pollen (it's not dissolved, just really really small), but the even a 400 micron filter takes an irritatingly long time.

    Someday it will be the fashion to have a couple of bees floating around in the honey... someday...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Default

    >Someday it will be the fashion to have a couple of bees floating around in the honey... someday...

    http://www.reallyrawhoney.com/

    Someday is here.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    piperton,Tennessee,usa
    Posts
    369

    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >Someday it will be the fashion to have a couple of bees floating around in the honey... someday...

    http://www.reallyrawhoney.com/

    Someday is here.
    Mite, SHB and all larva all included huh? Crunchy must be the fav of most beeks. "most bang for the buck"

    Cant wait to see whats really found in it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Many of the people that have bought my honey have said... they like mine better because they don't find "floaties" in their honey as opposed to some others selling honey around me.... It looks "cleaner". I've explained that its most likely pollen and maybe some small wax flakes but they say they like the look of mine.

    I have had a few people ask my why my "local honey" isn't cloudy like some others around. I explain that I filter mine thru a stainless strainer and then a nylon filter cloth but do DO NOT super heat my honey to pasturize it etc.... I think the hottest my honey has been is 100 deg and that was the room temp at the time with no heat source other than the sun heating my honeyhouse on a hot Aug day. It does filter quite well at 100deg.

    That said... I have had 1 person who has asked me to take a few jars and open the extractor gate and give him whatever comes out. He doesn't want anything excluded.

    I sell comb honey as well... I tell people that if they want unprocessed honey that comb honey is the best they can get.

    Seems to be different people want different things... Just like some people want glass jars NOT plastic...
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Default

    So the 200 micron is actually the demensions of the holes with 600 having the largest. Cool. I had it bass ackwards. My kids like it with pollen in and not pasturized. Besides they've seemed to be healthier since we started eating our own honey. They like the flavor better also, along with others who've tried it.

    My kids are my most important customer base. Minimum price a hug and a kiss a day.

    Sorry about the rambling. Thanks for the information. I sure needed it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    The various "xxx micron" filters (paint strainers sold by Dadant) work
    much, much better if one sets up a multi-stage filtering scheme,
    with:

    1) A colander, to catch the large chunks of wax and such

    2) A nylon mesh (not cheesecloth, as this introduces lint into the honey)

    3) The 200 or 400 micron filter

    The easy way to do this is to use the "bottomless 5-gallon pail", sold
    by many bee supply companies, which sits securely atop a 5-gallon
    pail which catches the filtered honey. With this approach, the
    micron-filter sits in the top of the bottomless pail, the nylon mesh
    is slung over the filter, and held in place with a tight bungee cord,
    and the colander sits atop the mesh.

    I used this set-up for years before I had to invest in bigger throughput,
    and on a hot day, it can keep up with most hand-uncapping and
    extraction speeds.

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