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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    PICTURES: Re-Roofing. Any hints/suggestions/warnings?

    Here are some pictures of my Dad's and my progress on our roof.







    Half of my apiary from the roof!


    More later

    -Nathanael
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    Suggestion: don't let yourself get so distracted by the sight of your beehives that you do something foolish like falling off!!

    The nice clean roof looks like it is in pretty good shape.

    Rick

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Skull Valley, Az
    Posts
    285

    Default shingles

    Yep--don't look at the hives. 'Course you know to start at the bottom--flip the first row backwards so the goo seals at the edge. Then if you like--you can get playful and uase different colors in soothing patterns or go crazy quilt.

    Myself, I have all metal roofing. Did it myself.
    Lol
    BBZZZZZ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    Glad to see you went with the total tear off. You will not regret that.

    I second the clean roof. Looks solid.

    Are you going with the membrane along the edge?? They are a great way
    to go. Easy application too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Pics of Progress!

    Here are some pictures of how far Dad and I have gotten. We just finished our second layer of shingles not any more than 10 minutes ago. (My Dad's the one in the pictures, I'm taking them.)





    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    Are you going with the membrane along the edge?? They are a great way
    to go. Easy application too.
    What is a membrane? My Dad and I aren't familiar with that term. Is it the drip edge? We're putting that up.

    -Nathanael
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Big Grin First two sections DONE!

    My sister and I (we need something to do during summer vacation, why not help dad?) got up at 6 am this morning to beat the heat and got the first two sections of our roof brushed off finished up and shingled! Here are some pictures.







    -Nathanael
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
    Posts
    696

    Default

    Great job, Nathaneal, you guys are wonderful to help your dad out like this - and help him save a bundle, too!
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    nathanial sezs:
    What is a membrane? My Dad and I aren't familiar with that term. Is it the drip edge? We're putting that up.

    tecumseh replies:
    a membrane is typically used in most nothern climates to prevent the problems of ice daming along the tail ends of the roof joist. you would likely never need that anywhere south of the mason dixon line unless you have snow accumulating in quantity.

    tecumseh take:
    architectural grade shingles... always worth the extra money. I hope you used 30 pound felt for the underlayment (small detail which often pays large returns-but typically not required by the manufactures)?

    finally on one picture your dad was using an air nailer... no huge deal here but he seems to be shooting the nail a bit too high (actually much too high for me). this may (or perhaps could might be a better word) be a problem with high winds (less a problem for architectural shingles than three tab).

    shingle work is tough gurelling labor, the tear off is tough and the putting back is not much easier... and that is why I like metal in almost all applications of roof covering.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    I hope you used 30 pound felt for the underlayment (small detail which often pays large returns-but typically not required by the manufactures)?
    Yes, we've been putting down one layer of 30lb. felt. Some people have mentioned putting down two layers, is this necessary?

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    finally on one picture your dad was using an air nailer... no huge deal here but he seems to be shooting the nail a bit too high (actually much too high for me). this may (or perhaps could might be a better word) be a problem with high winds (less a problem for architectural shingles than three tab).
    I noticed that when I was tearing off the old three tab shingles they had nailed them farther down. So from about the fifth row up I nailed them closer to the yellow line on the shingle. This way I'd actually end up nailing each shingle twice. Four to five nails near the bottom, and then another four to five at the top when putting on the overlaying shingle above it.

    -Nathanael
    Last edited by Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary; 06-12-2007 at 10:09 AM.
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    beachs' sezs:
    beachs' sezs:
    Yes, we've been putting down one layer of 30lb. felt. Some people have mentioned putting down two layers, is this necessary?

    tecumseh replies:
    well I am not certain that two layers is so necessary. I never like 15 pound (except to cover walls) since it rips so easy (matter of fact it is almost impossible to walk on without tearing hole in the material). I always preferred 30 pounds since it is the last layer to give you protection when the current shingle give way.


    beachs' then states:
    I noticed that when I was tearing off the old three tab shingles they had nailed them farther down. So from about the fifth row up I nailed them closer to the yellow line on the shingle. This way I'd actually end up nailing each shingle twice. Four to five nails near the bottom, and then another four to five at the top when putting on the overlaying shingle above it.

    tecumseh replies:
    I haven't done a compositie shingle roof in some time beachs so everything I say is null and void if the instructions on the bundles instuct you otherwise. most times if you just follow along with what the instruction as the bundle suggest you can't go wrong.

    it seems to me that the number of nails typically 3 to 5 is dependent on roof slope. looking at the picture of your dad there is about a two inch area that overlaps (looking at the edge of the shingle). about an inch above the middle of the top shingle is where I typically would drive the nails. thus each nail penetrates the top shingle just above the center and the lower layer at the top of the shingle (I think that is what you may have desribed in you previous post???). position of the nails can effect whether wind can get up under and peel off shingles (this should be less of a problem with architectural shingle than with three tab singles simple due to the weight difference).

    There is some joy in standing up there on the roof and looking at a job well done, but I bet you and your dad are equally thankful that the task is simply behind ya'?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    it seems to me that the number of nails typically 3 to 5 is dependent on roof slope. looking at the picture of your dad there is about a two inch area that overlaps (looking at the edge of the shingle). about an inch above the middle of the top shingle is where I typically would drive the nails. thus each nail penetrates the top shingle just above the center and the lower layer at the top of the shingle (I think that is what you may have desribed in you previous post???).
    Yes, that's what I was trying to convey.

    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    There is some joy in standing up there on the roof and looking at a job well done, but I bet you and your dad are equally thankful that the task is simply behind ya'?
    It's great to see two sections done. It boosts our spirits and gives us more confidence for the rest to come! Looking over it all we start to think "Hey, maybe we can do this!"

    Thanks for the help!

    -Nathanael
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

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