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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default The desert is blooming

    When everything comes together in the desert it can be beautiful







    More here
    http://s29.photobucket.com/albums/c2...ert%20flowers/
    Last edited by Barry Digman; 06-03-2007 at 08:42 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default





    Last edited by Barry Digman; 06-03-2007 at 08:49 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
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    47

    Default

    Beautiful , I've always loved cactus blooms, Are there two Yucca blooms? I think the pale yellow stalk is Yucca, is the white one also?
    SIStone

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sistone View Post
    Beautiful , I've always loved cactus blooms, Are there two Yucca blooms? I think the pale yellow stalk is Yucca, is the white one also?
    Here's a closer look at the white one. The yellow is Yucca, I don't know the name of this one.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    2,030

    Default

    Flowers in the desert never cease to amaze me. Such beauty when you actually look closely at such an outwardly hostile environment. I love the tiny cactus!
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default

    If you look closely at this one, you'll see a mule deer track at about the three o'clock position in the photo. The country here is somewhat deceiving to those who've not been here. These shots were all taken yesterday on my way back from Albuquerque. The elevation ranges from 5,000ft - 8,000ft., so one passes through everything from desert to alpine. It's not the same as the Sonora or other southwestern deserts.
    I had to laugh about the yellow sweet clover growing right alongside the highway all the way down. It's a lush strip that's never more than 3 feet wide, but there's 150 miles of it. The whole stretch wouldn't make more than a 50-acre field if it were all together. I can't figure out a way to take advantage of it.




  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Southern Delaware
    Posts
    69

    Question

    Coyote, I have been through that area before and will be out in Durango via Albuquerque this August. My uncle works at Los Alomos. I was wondering if you get a surplus honey crop and if so what is the average. I know in August driving through I could'nt see anything blooming. Thanks Madison....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madison68 View Post
    Coyote, I have been through that area before and will be out in Durango via Albuquerque this August. My uncle works at Los Alomos. I was wondering if you get a surplus honey crop and if so what is the average. I know in August driving through I could'nt see anything blooming. Thanks Madison....
    The real beekeepers around here do make good crops, but it's from hives that are in the river basins. A fellow near me was pullling 2-3 mediums per hive before he quit. The average for NM is reported to be 40lbs. Some of the other NM beeks here probably know better than me what's happening in their area. (They're a tight-lipped bunch for sure)
    Not much blooms around here in August, particularly in a dry year. Watch out for the Durangutangs while on vacation.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
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    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coyote View Post
    Here's a closer look at the white one. The yellow is Yucca, I don't know the name of this one.

    And after two hours plus the name is Palmer's Penstemon, also known as Scented Penstemon. I thought I'd never find it.
    SIStone

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sistone View Post
    And after two hours plus the name is Palmer's Penstemon, also known as Scented Penstemon. I thought I'd never find it.
    I appreciate that. There's a Rocky Mountain Penstemon that's bluish and I thought they might be related.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
    Posts
    503

    Default

    We've stopped trying to identify each penstemon and aster and just say "dunno, its some kind of penstemon..." There are just too many around.

    So far it has been a good year in the high desert. Some wildflower seeds lay in wait in the soil for years for just such a season. Flowers I haven't seen for several years are making appearances.

    nice pics coyote

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