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Thread: Homemade Nucs

  1. #1
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    Default Homemade Nucs

    I want to make some 5-frame nucs. If I use 1/4" plywood for sides (solid 3/4 w/ handholds in ends), two nucs will fit side-by-side on a 10-frame brood chamber.

    Question: Any problem w/ the 1/4" thickness?

  2. #2
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    Hi Dave

    Seems pretty thin to me. I would be worried about getting a good corner joint. If you are wanting to stack them I would consider going with 4 framers built of at least 1/2inch stock

  3. #3
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    No reason why it wouldn't work. It may be a bit more prone to warping, but should work just fine. I just made up a couple nuc boxes with 3/4" wood ends, and corrugated plastic for sides, bottom and top. Seemed to work just fine and cut off quite a bit of the cost. Thought it might be a viable alternative to the cardboard nuc, but would be much more durable. Testing a couple this year to see if they work well for mating queens and then selling the nuc.

    -Tim

  4. #4
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    Dave & others

    I made 4 this last winter with 3/4" ends and 3/8" bottoms and 1/4" sides, these were for a friend that was picking up nucs from another friend of mine so i just used whatever I found in the scrap box the top was make of masinanit (spelling) with 3 - 3" holes covered with #8 wire for ventlation and handles on the end ( is this clear as mud) but just this morning I was thinking about building some to winter on top of another hive and the measuerments work out real good so later I may try and build some more but with solid tops.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  5. #5
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    oh [light bulb goes off] the 3/4 " ends makes sense. I was trying to envision 1/4" inch all around. Yeah that sounds like a plan. Might try that myself! I see now that you had that in the original post. That's what Iget for talking on the phone while trying to write on Beesource!
    Last edited by BerkeyDavid; 05-29-2007 at 11:34 AM.

  6. #6
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    I got one built as you describe when i purchased a nuc a 3 years ago.

    The one thing about it is that it wouldn't work well with a migratory top. It came with a small telescoping top that fit tight and helped keep the 1/4 side boards from warping. When I take the lid off the sides do bow out. I have to press the sides inward when putting the top on.

    That said. This is its 3rd year and was starting to look a little beat up even though painted. It did NOT stay out during winter. I hot dipped it to seal the interior and it should last a while. I wouldn't give them a long life span not dipped but 2-4 years should be doable painted inside and out.

    Without paint or a sealer of some type 1/4 doesn't hold up that long especially if exposed to the type of moisture it would get on top of a larger hive. I'm talking internal moisture here. If I were going with thin material such as this I would seal the inside AND outside if you are looking to maintain them longer than 1-2 seasons.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  7. #7
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    Thanx for ALL the replies . . .

    Will the 1/4" thickness (I'm thinking "insulation") be OK in winter?

    Two nucs side-by-side will have 1/2" between (I dont see a problem), but only 1/4" on the outsides seems a bit thin (???).

    Any thoughts???


    DAN . . .

    >Warped (bowing) sides . . .

    Can you tell me which way the "grain" runs (on 1/4" material)?
    Up and down, or front to back????

  8. #8
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    somewhere I read about making em out of that 3/4" thick foam insulation they make in 4'x8' sheets
    wouldn't stand up to a hive tool but short term might be ok

    Dave

  9. #9
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    Run the grain front to back. this will minimize warping. I don't know where you live but around here (northern Oklahoma) insulation is not an issue. You just want to stop the wind. the cluster only generates enough heat to keep itself warm. It doesn't heat the inside of the hive.

  10. #10
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    Default Foam insulation

    [QUOTE=drobbins;238775]somewhere I read about making em out of that 3/4" thick foam insulation they make in 4'x8' sheets
    wouldn't stand up to a hive tool but short term might be ok

    What glue does one use? I saw sheets in a debris box this morning?

  11. #11
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    You use a polyurethane glue like Gorilla Glue.

    Polyurethane glues need water to cure, and MUST be clamped while setting.

    I just use a plant mister to wet one side of the foam a little and then spread the glue on the other piece and clamp them together. Once set it is quite solid.

    If you can get the stuff out of the trash bin I go dumpster diving if I were you.

    P.S. I called Gorilla Glue and was told that Gorilla Glue is non-toxic once dry. Someone else had asked about that. It is bad stuff when wet, but once dry it is inert. I asked if it was safe to use on a cutting board for human food prep and they said YES.
    Troy

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave W View Post

    DAN . . .

    >Warped (bowing) sides . . .

    Can you tell me which way the "grain" runs (on 1/4" material)?
    Up and down, or front to back????
    I'll try to remember to take a look when I go out to the bee yard this afternoon.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by drobbins View Post
    somewhere I read about making em out of that 3/4" thick foam insulation they make in 4'x8' sheets
    wouldn't stand up to a hive tool but short term might be ok

    Dave
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...2&postcount=15

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  14. #14
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    For 5 frame nucs, I just put a divider board in a 10 frame box.

  15. #15
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    >cluster only generates enough heat to keep itself warm. It doesn't heat the inside of the hive . . .

    Why are we told to overwinter nucs on top of strong hives?


    >For 5 frame nucs, I just put a divider board in a 10 frame box . . .

    Sounds good . . . until it's time to SELL

  16. #16
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    They don't heat the sides. Hot air rises and heat the top. So the hive/nuc on top does benefit from the heat from below.

    Some sellers require the buyer to provide the nuc box.

    hawk
    KC0YXI

  17. #17
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    Tell them to bring a box

  18. #18
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    for outdoor use gorilla glue or elmer's copy cat exterior seems to be the ticket I've made nucs with all 3/4 pine. Easy to cut frame rest into, very strong and durable, plenty thick enough for stacking, don't warp. Make your own telescoping cover or migratory covers. I understand about using whats available. My hook end hive tool is cut and ground out of a used lawnmower blade. My smoker is homemade from cans I got from the landfill recycling bin and other odds and ends I had around the house. Sometimes it pays to be a saver of everything

  19. #19
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    Make my nucs from scraps from deeps and hives, plywood or anything else free. But if someone buys bees they bring it back or I keep their $40.00. Some wanna keep them. Dont know why tho.

  20. #20
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    I just made a nice 5-frame, 6-1/4" depth nuc from 1-1/2" thick insulation foam board. I cut the parts out with a straight edge and a sharp steak knife, then I glued the ends and sides together with hot-melt glue, then glued the bottom on, cut a matching piece for a lid, cut a rectangle of foam out on the back end and inserted #8 wire for ventilation, cut a circular opening in the front for an entrance and lined it with a section cut from a plastic medicine bottle and rubbed with beeswax for added traction, hot melt glued wooden support rails to suspend the frames from. I plan to try it in the morning to make up another mating nuc.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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