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Thread: Bottling Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cedar Falls, IA
    Posts
    16

    Default Bottling Honey

    Just curious about the process is for bottling or canning honey? When canning do you create a vaccum to seal the jars?

    Thanks
    Jeff in Iowa.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Default

    Nope, just fill and screw the lid on. Honey if properly cured by the bees, is it's own preservative.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Default

    No vacuum is necessary. I simply filter mine out of the extractor, into 5 gal buckets. Then I let it sit for a few days so the air bubbles come up. Then I use a bucket with a spout at the bottom to bottle as I strain it again either through a nylon sieve or some discarded panty-hose. I let it sit again for a few days to let the air bubbles rise and skim off any foam or debris. I always fill my jars well up into the neck and use 1-piece lids.

    Some people heat their honey to make it flow better, but heating can destroy some of the good stuff in the honey and may alter the taste and fragrance.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    651

    Default Discarded Panty Hose

    >I strain it again either through a nylon sieve or some discarded panty-hose.

    I like it ! I just couldn't resist .
    sc-bee

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose CA
    Posts
    164

    Default

    > Some people heat their honey to make it flow better, but
    > heating can destroy some of the good stuff in the honey
    > and may alter the taste and fragrance.

    A few years ago I came across a report in which scientists used a probe to check the temperature in several places around hives which were located from direct sun to shade. The numbers I remember as 'typical' range were mid-90's in the brood nest and 125 in the top super. At temps above 125 the comb was in danger of collapse.

    Warming honey to a 100 to help it flow would not affect any of the attributes, because that is a natural temperature.

    It's a fair bet though that anything above 125 seems likely to affect taste and fragrance.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cedar Falls, IA
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Thank you for the responses. I was thinking that you didn't want to heat up the honey to much and that would make it hard to pull a vaccum. Thanks again.
    Jeff in Iowa.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,540

    Default

    I WARM my honey to about 110 to 115 and when it cools in qt jars the lids "pop" seal like my Mother`s canning jars.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

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