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Thread: name the flower

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    You got me, looks like a sea anemone. But I'm going to maintain my dignity and say it must be a southern flower I'm not familiar with...
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  3. #3
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    Is it a Dahlia?
    Si hoc legere scis numium eruditionis habes.

  4. #4
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    Wausau Wi
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    onoin blossom ?
    Everything happens for a reason. Time heals all wounds - time and a half heals them even faster

  5. #5
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    Hanson, MA & Lebanon, ME
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    It's a composite flower, if it weren't so pale I'd say it was a dandelion.
    - Ann, a Gardening Beek

  6. #6
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    That would be one monster dandelion!

    Are the leaves oposite or alternate?

  7. #7
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    Without seeing the rest of the plant I will guess? A flower of the Button Bush.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    That's not a flower, it's Phylis Dillers wig!

    I thought Onion too but not watery enough.

  10. #10
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    I thought onion too, and since I have no other idea...I'll stick with onion...but, not placing any bets on it!

  11. #11
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    I think it looks like some kind of Thistle.

  12. #12
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    Fort McMurray, Canada
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    Default correct. Yellow thistle we believe

    The bees love them.
    Lat 56N

  13. #13
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    Washington Island, Wi
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    I was going to guess a thistle - we have Canadian thistle here, it is a darker pink than that one - it's a "weed" - but don't tell the bees that - they love it!

  14. #14
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    Saint Clair, MI
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    There are two different flowers there right?
    First a thistle and second dutch clover?
    Cindy
    Cindy

  15. #15
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    Its actually Burdock....thistle is the family it belongs too.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  16. #16
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    Exclamation Musk thistle!

    Musk thistle, a cattle ranchers worse enemy. We go out every summer when the blooms are popping and dig them out. Now the government has introduced a predator that lays it's egg in the plant and the larva eats the developing seeds.

    EDIT; I answered before I read the posts sorry.
    Last edited by BULLSEYE BILL; 04-05-2007 at 11:37 PM. Reason: Jumped the gun.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  17. #17
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    Ok flathead the music has quit playing What is it??
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  18. #18
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    the burdock we have up here is not spiny.

    Definitely a thistle, but more spiny than any in this area. My book says the "upright, spiny leaves that surround the flowerhead make a good identifier" of a yellow thistle. I think you are right.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  19. #19
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    thistle of some species, or at least that's my guess.

  20. #20
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    Default

    >the burdock we have up here is not spiny.

    Someone mentioned Burdock. The closest you can get to Burdock is that Burdock and Yellow Thistle are both in the Composite family. But, I think that's the largest plant family.

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