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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Default

    "Not many critters will take chickens during the day unless they're pretty brazen" We got hawks! They'll take up a chicken no problem. I've got a very protective rooster and when I let them free range, I've seen him hide "the girls" under a bush and he stands guard until the danger has passed.

    I used to close them up in their coop every night and then let them out into their screened run the next morning, but it got to be a hassle so I did what Mike did. "6" landscape edging buried into the ground all the way around the run. So far so good.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Marshall, VA USA
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Have you tried Premier Fence Supply? They sell electronet fencing that lets you pasture your birds while keeping them protected behind electric fencing. If whatever is attacking your birds is ground-based they'll stop in short order. The fencing comes in 82 and 160' rolls with posts built into the roll by the manufacturer. Really easy to move and work with. I'll never go back to chicken wire.

    Hope this helps.

    Mike
    If you're not confused you just don't know what's going on.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Now PLEASE don't start shooting the HAWKS!! They are FEDERALY protected anyway. A Coopers Hawk may be the culprit: not a Redtail.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,205

    Default

    [QUOTE=Tia;218818]"Not many critters will take chickens during the day unless they're pretty brazen" We got hawks! They'll take up a chicken no problem. I've got a very protective rooster and when I let them free range, I've seen him hide "the girls" under a bush and he stands guard until the danger has passed.

    Geez Tia, where'd you get your rooster? All my roosters seem to do is hump and bite me in the butt! They're usually the first to run when predators are around! Useless...

    Oldbee, I promise I won't shoot the hawks. We don't even own a gun! Some farmer I am thanks for all the input guys. If you think of anything else, post it. I'll take all the ideas I can get!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    If the heads are missing and it's night it's either weasels or raccoons. Throw down some talcum powder around the perimter after the hens are roosting for the night and check it in the morning for prints. You can live trap the maurders and transport them 20 miles or so but nature hates a void. Better to set up high roosts and a secure night door. Our Austrialian Shepherd would warn us of trouble in the hen house (as well as bears in the equipment yard) from inside the house at all hours of the night. A good herd dog goes a long way. I remeber one night I went down to find my wife in the chicken house grasped firmly on the tail of skunk which had its' feet locked into the front of the nesting box and she was pulling for all she was worth, AND, wearing my gloves. I immediately wished her the best of luck and vacated the area.

    Mother Earth news has an article on portable chicken fencing (10 yrs ago or so). It may have been titled a "Chicken and Grape Permaculture". If I can find my index I'll try to find the volume and you should be able to find it at the library.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Default

    I know for a fact that raccoons will eat the skin off the neck and face of a chicken and leave the rest. Around here they only do it when there is snow on the ground and the nights are cold. Reason of course is that they want the fat of the skin and not the protein of the breast meat. I have lost several over the years to raccoons. It is almost always the same. Once 2 birds were gone without a trace but I suspect this also was the coons. Here's what I did.. hook up one of those transmitters that folks use on their baby's crib to your chicken coop. Put the receiver 'On' next to your bed. The coons will come and see if you left the coop unlocked. When they do the chickens will start clucking, you'll wake up..
    You can figure out the rest.
    A shotgun is a wonderful tool.
    Last edited by longarm; 03-20-2007 at 07:59 PM.

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