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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Posts
    24

    Default Feral Colony Removal

    I removed two (2) hives from one wall at a communications company cell site.

    The colonies were gentle considering I ran a skill saw with a carbide blade across the top of there home.

    Both colonies were transferred into nucís. I was able to locate the queen in this hive (That was a first.)

    I inspected the other colony a week later and they have produced seven (7) supercedure cells. I killed all but two of them.

    I was surprised by how calm they were considering Iím in the heart of AHB country. - San Fernando, Ca

    My tendency is to re-queen these but I wonder if I should.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    199
    That looks cool!

  3. #3

    Default

    Looks like some worker brood and alot of drone brood. Requeening may be a good idea.
    "To bee or not to bee"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Posts
    24

    Default Brood Comb

    What you see in the photos is about a third of the comb. The new (White) comb was full of eggs and the rest had plenty of regular broad. As I removed the comb I exposed layers behind that Big Piece (Where most of the broad comb was.) of comb in the center.

  5. #5

    Default

    Very impressive. Did you to tie up the comb in frames?
    Last edited by newbee 101; 03-14-2007 at 04:10 AM.
    "To bee or not to bee"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ventura, Ca
    Posts
    24

    Default Rubber Bands

    Rubber bands work good..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Default

    Great pictures. A few more closups of orientation like that one would be enlightening to those who have not seen natural comb and believe it's all oriented the same based on the attachment. The one in your closeup, for example is neither vertical nor horizontal but a bit of an angle and that angle does not reflect the substrate of the plate above.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Terre Haute, Indiana
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Just watched another program on AHB's and there seems to be a strain starting that is as calm as the more "acceptable" strains. The beeks were handeling them without suits and just like any other bee.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    chatsworth, calif usa
    Posts
    405

    Default

    Jeff-

    Those look like great bees!

    I wouldn't re-queen until you have good reason to. You would already know if they were nasty bees and they dont look like it in your picture.

    I think if you keep them on foundationless frames, they'll stay happy and healthy for a long time.

    I picked up a swarm last week that measured 4.5mm on the fresh comb they built- very exciting for me. Have you measured yours?

    Jealosly yours.
    jim

    P.S. If this gets double posted, my apologies. I'm still having navigational problems.
    Last edited by jim b; 03-16-2007 at 09:36 PM.
    My Mom's other kids are smarter than me, but i'm not nearly as nice.

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