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Thread: My Truck

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,398

    Default My Truck

    I finally sold my VW Bug and bought a used 1999 Ford Ranger.

    A truck... finally!

    Now I have a question.... my bee yards are not in very woody areas but this time of year, there is some mud. I have NEVER gottan stuck with my VW bug but today when I was leaving one of my bee yards, I bot stuck in the mud and could not get out.

    My questions..... how do you avoid getting stuck and if you do get stuck, how do you get out without feeling stupid and asking for help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
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    5,080

    Default

    First, kill the man that took your VW and threw a ford off on you.

    Second, buy you two come-alongs and a couple of chains. When one come-along runs out of travel, hook up the other one and put tension on the chain before releasing the other one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
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    2,115
    There is nothing wrong with a Ford truck I have a 1997 Ford Ranger and it starts every time I turn the key doesn’t use a drop of oil or leak any oil, the body is still tight and rides well for a small gutless truck. As far as not getting stuck the only solution would be sell the Range and get a 4X4. or get a wench for your truck so you can pull yourself out.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    Default

    Brent: How much is a wench?

    a come along.... what is that?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
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    6,498

    Default

    First you have to adjust to a vehicle that has no weight over the drive wheels, (assuming it's a 2X and not a 4X). You need the right tires also. The all-weather treads aren't the best for mud and snow either. One with even a mild lug works much better in mud or snow. Throw some weight in the bed, directly over the axle. I use sand. I also carry a set of chains, and put them on before I'm in a place that could stick me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Greensboro, N.C.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
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    2,552

    Default

    Carry some honey at all times as thank yous for being pulled out.
    Sheri

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
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    Default

    Chef: try this web link http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...atchallpartial I have done a lot of business with Northern Tool and have never been disappointed
    Last edited by Brent Bean; 03-10-2007 at 08:17 PM.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    Default

    {Brent: How much is a wench?}
    Much depends on what she looks like and if she is strong enough to push a truck out of the mud.

    A Winch on the other had can be had for about $300

    Two thing that will help are added weight in the back and and momentum whenever you are facing mud.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
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    Ok Joel I didn’t know we got graded down for spelling.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    Default

    Oh no, I speak from experiance. Mine is quite attractive and has quite ably pushed my trucks out of the mud on many occaisions.

    She costs me everything I have but I would not trade her for a winch and a plow!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NC Piedmont
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    2

    Default

    One cheap "getting outta the mud" tool I used to carry was a small square of old chain link fence. Maybe 4' x 4', rolled up. When one of your wheels starts spinning, unroll the fence and stuff it as close as you can to the spinning tire. The chain link gives that wheel some added traction and you can usually get free.
    +1 on added weight in the truck bed, and the most important thing...
    Never stop in a slippery or muddy spot. Keep moving, your momentum will keep you from sinking in!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    central north carolina
    Posts
    56

    Big Grin stuck

    i keep at least two queen excluders in my truck, put one of them under each back tire and happy motoring

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Laurel, MS
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    1,026

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    My questions..... how do you avoid getting stuck and if you do get stuck, how do you get out without feeling stupid and asking for help?
    Avoidance = stay out of the ruts and/or get mud tires
    Stuck = Need a wench

    Only thing about good mud tires, they whine/roar on pavement, very annoying.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Inver Grove, MN
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    Big Grin

    Momentum is the key. Like was said earlier, keep moving; never stop unless you know you are in a place with good traction. The faster you keep moving, the better. If you can get the entire truck to take to the air, traction becomes a non-issue.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    Default

    so queen excluders really work?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default

    First, of course, don't drive on soft ground and don't drive in the mud.

    Second, get some cable "chains" for the tires.

    Third, put a bag of chicken grit behind the seat. When you get stuck throw some under the tires for traction.

    Fourth, keep a shovel behind the seat. make sure if a tire has sunk in you give it a path to get out instead of trying to go over the "hump" of the hole you've dug with the tire.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
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    6,624

    Default

    Avoid mud.

    Avoid stopping if you find yourself in mud.

    Chances are, if you get really buried in mud, knobby tires and chains won't help a bit because most 2x trucks don't have the power to pull themselves out of a hole anyways. Never underestimate the power of suction!

    If you use a come-a-long (good iddee!) make sure you hook up to the *frame* and not some other body part. I've ripped bumpers and fenders off cars and trucks. They just don't build them like they used to. I've also destroyed my share of come-a-longs which they don't make like they used to either. Spend the bucks, get good ones.

    The best bet unless you're really equipped for it is to avoid mud. This is advice from someone who spent years of his youth not avoiding mud and getting horribly horribly stuck as a result. Of course, we used to call that "fun"
    Dulcius ex asperis

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    6,973

    Default

    my other brother george sezs:
    The best bet unless you're really equipped for it is to avoid mud. This is advice from someone who spent years of his youth not avoiding mud and getting horribly horribly stuck as a result. Of course, we used to call that "fun"

    tecumseh adds:
    exactly george, our similarities grow with time. I intentional have road tires on my one ton because this encourages me not to go places where I might get stuck. but stuff does happens... at which point it is best to be on good terms with the local farmers who own tractors to pull you out of the muck. honey is a most excellent bribe.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Skull Valley, Az
    Posts
    285

    Default

    All good replys. I use the come-along to stretch fenceline. Had to use it to load father-in-law's Model A onto the flatbed as it didn't run and I was on my own. Slow going, but was the best $5.00 swapmeet tool. My Ranger is 4x4 w/mud tires to cross the perenially dry creekbeds. Keep moving is the key.
    BBZZZZZ

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