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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
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    529

    Question

    Does anyone have an exact volume for one pound of wax?

    I have read dimensions on e-bay of people selling a 1 lbs block and also 1/4 pound cakes but I really don't want to rely upon their approximations.

    Does anyone have concrete figures or references for volume/size at any specific weight?

    Thanks,

    Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,625

    Post

    I suppose it wouldn't be that hard to measure, as accurately as you wanted. I also suppose it could be somewhat variable depending on the amount of impurities. I may take a shot at this later if I get the chance.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Granted these are not scientific measurements, but I have some 8 ounce cakes, imprinted with the word 'Beeswax', that I weighed on a kitchen spring scale. The cakes, measured with a ruler, are 6 X 2.5 X 1.25 inches.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Post

    WAX
    1 oz wax = 1.798 cu. in.
    1 lb wax = 28.775 cu. in. OR about 2 cups

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
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    529

    Post

    Excellent!

    Those are the kind of refined numbers I was looking for.

    Thanks Guys,

    Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    uh-oh.... [img]redface.gif[/img] The numbers given by Dave disagree wildly from those of my earlier post. My 8 ounce wax cake has a volume of 18.75 cu. in. from the dimensions I measured. How can that bee? :confused: Well, it seemed obvious to me that Dave W. likely didn't know what he was talking about. I did go back though and measure the wax cake again. The revised measurements for my 8 ounce wax cakes are 5 X 2.5 X 1.25 inches (15.625 cu. in. for 8 ounces or 31.25 cu. in. for 1 lb. wax block) which are more in line with the precise values given by Dave W. (I go a tad bit over when pouring the wax into molds.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Post

    >seemed obvious to me that Dave W. likely didn't know what he was talking about . . .

    That happens often, please keep an eye on me [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Sometimes just an "inch" makes a difference [img]smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    Dick - That is about 10% more than Dave on both blocks. I'd say close enough for small time, but if I was selling 100 lbs, +/- 10 lbs could be some good change. Then again, I'd just directly weigh the dang blocks instead of trusting measurements.

    Good enough gents - thanks a lot,

    Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Why do you need volume measurements?? Weight is more accurate as density varies as well as some impurities that may affect weight to volume ratios.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Rome, GA
    Posts
    274

    Post

    Dave W is awfully close to the mark. I came up with 1 ounce = 1.772 cubic inches and 1 lbs = 28.352 cubic inches. The specific gravity of beeswax can range from .960 to .972.

    Dave, I'd say you DO know what you're talking about!
    I've found it easier to keep bees than keep relationships. At least when I'm stung by bees I know why.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    When making was cakes, candles, etc. its nice to know what sort of consumption of wax each item will consume. The volume of the container can be figured, but the weight of wax consumed can not. Knowing a waxeight ratio helps in a conversion.

    Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Post

    Jim Williamson . . .

    I used "Wax Relative Density at 68F = 0.963" [Ref 15, p119].


    NW IN Beekeeper . . .

    >weight of wax consumed . . .

    Remember, wax shrinks about 10% (so they say).

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