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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    in the south
    Posts
    14

    Post

    I was wondering if anyone had any experience with selling the beeswax after the honey harvest. How much do you sell it for and to whom? Thanks for the info.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    The money is never in the raw commodity.

    The money is in value-added products, such
    as candles, soaps, furniture polish, and
    (my personal favorite) wax-saturated thread
    for the wrapping of bagpipe reeds.

    Don't bother trying to get into the bagpipe
    reed business - I think I've got the market
    pretty much locked. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    in the south
    Posts
    14

    Wink

    bagpipe who?what??? ok.

    So my best bet would be to refine the wax and pour it into bar molds and sell it to soap or candle makers as i don't think I would like to get into the soap or candle making business. Sounds like too tedious work and with my limited time schedule it wouldn't work. Thanks for the suggestions. I'm still learning about all this. I'm starting my first hives this spring .

  4. #4

    Post

    Hi, my name is Tom. I'm not a beekeeper, but do find the subject facinating. A friend of mine from the Osarks is looking for some beeswax, and I was helping him to find some beekeepers. While here, I saw this discussion and thought I'd mention some other folks who use beeswax.

    Archers! We use bees wax for various things,but especially for our bowstrings. If you have beeswax to sell, you might consider posting a note on an archery related forum.

    I run a photo and discussion forum called PaleoPlanet. It pertains to all manner of prehistoric skills (making bows/arrows, stone tools, basketry and other fiber arts, pottery, edible plants, firestarting, etc.). Many of us use beeswax,in small amounts, on a regular basis.

    If anyone is interested, I could post your contact information on the PaleoPlanet site, and maybe send some business your way as a result!

    Just a thought....

    Tom
    There\'s no place like home!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Almost locked Jim...I supply some pipers (myself included) down here...

    BubbaBob
    Clan Beaton
    Sept of McBeth
    1964 Hardie blackwoods
    Atholl Highlanders Pipes and Drums
    Stone Mountain, GA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,349

    Post

    Incredible, two people in one place waxing bagpipe reeds. We are certainly a unique (some would call us odd) bunch. Many of us I'm sure had never even considered that bagpipe reeds would need waxing! If you want to make big bucks on your wax without doing much too it check out any beauty salon in you area which is primarly african american clients. These folks use it for their customers with dreadlocks (don't ask me how) and pay a decent price. Their customers actually use once the dreads are locked. Kind of scarry when you think about hot wax, hair and so on! Heck, I think I might get me some dreads if I can grow enough hair before I go completley bald!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Solve the going bald thingy like I did...shaved the head once I developed the little beanie skull cap bald spot...just call me Kojack...

    BubbaBob

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,349

    Post

    I hear the girls really like it too! Not that any of them look after you hit your 40's anyway! Oops my wife just walked in, ouch, gheesh, thanks bob you got me in trouble!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rainier, OR
    Posts
    247

    Post

    A growing market out West for industrial-grade wax might be people who build with cob (clay, sand and straw), strawbale and cordwood. They often use earthen floors--quite resiliant, actually--finished with beeswax and linseed oil.

    This finish is also used on cob benches, counters and walls.

    You can always google green building forums for more info and leads.
    Pocket Meadow Farm

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