Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    I cleaned my wax by melting it in water twice and filtering it through cloth. But, when I went to use it I found that it has grown a few "whiskers". Perhaps I did not clean it well enough?

    Also, while making parrafin candles I simply added a broken crayon to add color. But, with the beeswax I don't think the color is as smooth. Are crayons not a good coloring agent for beeswax, or do I just need to keep it hot longer to allow the color to mix better?

  2. #2

    Post

    Terri,
    That's not mold you're seeing - it's called "wax bloom"...it happens with pure beeswax. It's an oxidization thing that happens on the surface of beeswax. Just take an old nylon and buff the surface a time or two and your candle will be as good new!
    Guess I'm not surprised that using crayons (paraffin) doesn't mix well with beeswax. If you look at the chemical makeup of the two you'd see they're entirely different. If you want to colour your beeswax (which, I, personally can't relate to - I think the natural colour and smell of pure beeswax candles is one of the most rewarding things in life), BUT if you do, I'd say you're going to have to use some commercial colouring additives (that don't contain paraffin).
    [Probably shouldn't have been so strong about the colouring thing; do as your heart dictates - it was just my Russian Orthodox faith coming out; only pure beeswax candles are used to send up our prayers]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    I agree about not adding anything to bees wax candles.My wife always wanted to add coloring and scent and we argued over it.For some reason,I am just dead set against it.Like it cheapens something pure and natural.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Medford Lakes,NJ,USA
    Posts
    94

    Cool

    If it truly was mold...whiskers...maybe too much honey over the 15% level is still in the wax. Try heating the wax....be very careful....to between 180 degrees and 200 degrees for awhile. No, crayons are not a good source for color, they use parafin and your beeswax should be 100% beeswax..... Natural wax is the best color....but you may have to buy Wax Coloring Blocks from Betterbee or Glory Bee or Dadant. Yellow wax can give you different colors than you are looking for so some experimenting is necessary.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Greetings . . .

    Bloom on Beeswax

    On standing for a period of time, particularly in cold weather, a powdery substance forms on the surface of beeswax. Its sometimes referred to as mildew or mould, although it resembles neither one. Little is understood concerning the cause of bloom or its composition. If rubbed off, it may appear again. This phenomenon can be considered a characteristic of pure beeswax.

    Source: HIVE & HONEY BEE, 1963, p434

    ------------------
    Dave W . . .

    A NewBEE with 1 hive.
    First package installed
    April, 2003.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    Thanks! I melted it over water to be sure, and refiltered it. Mold or bloom, it is gone now! If the candles show anything I will just rub them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads