Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Galveston, IN
    Posts
    15

    Post

    I am from a pear only wine makeing background.I wanted to try mead, I've obtained my honey (Orange Blossom). I am not a patient person so this cold brew Idea sounds good, could someone explane the prosess of cold-brew and if this or the standard recipes with 2yrs of waiting would be best.Thanks for any help or info
    Ray Keller<br />E-Mail: RainhunterX@AOL.com

  2. #2

    Post

    The only thing I have heard of that could possible be brewing related that might go along with a "cold brew" is the lagering process for some kinds of beers.

    The kind of yeast you use ought dictate the the temperature.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,031

    Post

    If by cold-brew you mead no-heat must preparation, it's common and recommended. However I've not heard anything about it making a mead "faster". Actually boiled meads will usually clear out somewhat faster than a no-heat, though there are detriments to this method too. See the intro to meadmaking for a brief discussion of these methods.

    Truthfully, it's a pretty rare mead that doesn't benefit from at least a year of aging. I know two local meadmakers (pros) who have very good product out in less than that by rigorous control of temperature and consistent technique, but really mead just can't be rushed. Many recipes say to ferment hot (75 or even 80 F) but IMO that just gets you fermented out faster, not really better.

    Can you tell us what you mean by cold-brew and where it's described?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Galveston, IN
    Posts
    15

    Post

    Nursebee,Ben Brewcat
    I have no idea of the concept, it was mentioned by A guy going buy (Bullseye Bill) under the topic of (mead making Help). I haven't taken the time to contact him, his posting sound like a normal recipe but I'm new to all of this. (Just my 2yr making wines, and this will be my first Mead). I just dont get it, he says with a cold brew you get a very drinkable mead in less than seven weeks. I'm sure, I should just learn patience. And try a normal recipe. He just got my curiousity up. Just thought someone else might have know. My best bet to figure it out maybe to just email him. Thanks for your insight and help. If you get/got anymore info that can help I would be greatful thanks again
    Ray Keller<br />E-Mail: RainhunterX@AOL.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Post

    &gt;I know two local meadmakers (pros) who have very good product out in less than that by rigorous control of temperature and consistent technique, but really mead just can't be rushed.

    Ben Brewcat,
    you may be interested in this site.
    http://www.iqhilika.co.za/meadprod.htm
    "Whereas a batch method will take several months to ferment honey, the Makana Meadery method is capable of going from 0 to 14% alcohol in just 79 minutes".
    WOW, now that's fast! I wonder what would happen if they pushed it out to an hour and a half.
    George

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Hi Ray,
    If you are as impatient as I am, start two batches as instructed in my previous post. You can start drinking one in less than two months and the other you can let age, it will help. See how long you can last before tapping the second batch. If you don't like your results, it will be easier to wait.

    Aging does tend to mellow the taste and clear it too. I don't mind cloudiness in my drink.

    Remember the most important part is to use Premier Cuvee yeast, when it hits 14% it dies all at once.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clarksville, MI
    Posts
    92

    Post

    Those fast-brewing places are working on a large scale using continuous fermentation. I don't know the details, but I believe you toss more sugar into an already rocking fermentation, and because the yeast is so active it ferments really quickly. 79 minutes sounds rediculous though. And fermentation speed has little to do with aging time.

    Hot ferments (75+ degrees) produce nasty off flavors, in my opinion. I prefer fermentations around 70 degrees, or better yet 67-68. Yep, it takes longer, but you get a much cleaner tasting end product. If you don't mind some harshness, by all means try it faster.

    That cloudiness is suspended yeast. Some people, including myself, have violent intestinal reactions to consuming live yeast in large quantities. I highly recommend being very cautious drinking cloudy mead until you are certain that your gut can handle it. NOT FUN, trust me.
    <a href=\"http://www.slezakfarms.com\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.slezakfarms.com</a>

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,031

    Post

    Whereas a batch method will take several months to ferment honey, the Makana Meadery method is capable of going from 0 to 14% alcohol in just 79 minutes
    Yikes! I suspect that kerosene might have a preferable palate. Even Turboyeast, for making 25%+ "wash" to distill into booze takes 24-48 hours.


    Remember the most important part is to use Premier Cuvee yeast.
    It is a good strain; note however that most wine yeasts will make good mead. Each strain has its own character (flavors, aromas, alcohol tolerance, nitrogen needs, etc.), and it's more about matching the yeast you use with what you're looking for when you formulated your recipe. My personal favorite is Lallemand's D-47 Cotes-du-Rhone.


    Hot ferments (75+ degrees) produce nasty off flavors, in my opinion. I prefer fermentations around 70 degrees, or better yet 67-68. Yep, it takes longer, but you get a much cleaner tasting end product. If you don't mind some harshness, by all means try it faster.
    Heartily agree.


    That cloudiness is suspended yeast. Some people, including myself, have violent intestinal reactions to consuming live yeast in large quantities.
    Often including explosive flatulence, as most homebrewers who bottle can attest. Cloudiness can also be from proteins, pectins, etc. Most yeasts will flocculate out within a couple weeks of the cessation of fermentation, while the other stuff can take more time. That's why a boiled and skimmed mead clears so quickly; you're removed a lot of those proteinaceous hazers. Yeast has a pretty distinctive taste; you'll know if you're drinking yeast, either by flavor or the next morning!
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    &gt;quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Remember the most important part is to use Premier Cuvee yeast.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    &gt;It is a good strain; note however that most wine yeasts will make good mead. Each strain has its own character (flavors, aromas, alcohol tolerance, nitrogen needs, etc.), and it's more about matching the yeast you use with what you're looking for when you formulated your recipe. My personal favorite is Lallemand's D-47 Cotes-du-Rhone.

    The reasoning of my mentor on this yeast selection is mostly due to the fact that when the yeast gets to about 14% it just dies. From that point it's done. The only improvment from then on is aging and clearifing.

    I should also make the distinction of what I meant by cold brew when I used that term, and that was simply not heating (read boil) the must ingrediants, especially the honey. I have a great adversion to heating honey for any reason. I believe it ruins the natural flavor of the honey.

    I have no choice but to store my carboys at room temperature. If and when I have access to a basement or cellar, I will experiment with the true defination of "cold brew".
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Galveston, IN
    Posts
    15

    Post

    Bullseye Bill
    Thanks for the better info and explanation
    Ray Keller<br />E-Mail: RainhunterX@AOL.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Galveston, IN
    Posts
    15

    Post

    Thanks to everyone who has responeded
    Ray Keller<br />E-Mail: RainhunterX@AOL.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    8

    Post

    My experience is that mead takes less time to become 'done' than traditional wines because the sugar in honey is already in a more convinenient form for the yeast than the fructose in grapes (or pears). As a result of this I find that most still meads can be ready for drinking in about 3 months. Sparkling takes a little longer because of the second fermentation. Obviously, leaving it longer helps the flavours (just like most wines), but not enough for me to be able to stop myself getting stuck in as soon as possible.
    time is passing...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads