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  1. #1

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    I use this Simha recipe: http://davespicks.com/writing/mme/recipes/simha.html

    I read somehwere that honey could also be used in this recipe, but I wouldnt know how much to put in. And I dont think it should be done while bottling as that could throw off the carbonation process and the bottles would explode .

    I have 5lb of un-pasturized clover honey.

    Also, an off-topic question, what is it about Simha that makes it non-alcoholic?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,045

    Post

    Whew. That recipe probably would fall into the "pruno" (prison hooch) type of beverage, perhaps more useful for historical interest than for regular consumption. Certainly could be made using honey I guess, though it would certainly benefit from using different yeast. Bread yeast is used for bread because it produces a lot of CO2 quickly, not because it tastes like anything you'd want to drink in beverages. For a quick buzz, you might consider just using the sugar and save the honey for eating.

    That recipe would be alcoholic however, unless you could continuously feed it oxygen somehow. I didn't see on that page a non-alcoholic claim.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  3. #3

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    The non-alcoholic claim is on this page: http://www.dlc.fi/~marianna/gourmet/mead.htm

    Its the same recipe.

    "it would certainly benefit from using different yeast. Bread yeast is used for bread because it produces a lot of CO2 quickly, not because it tastes like anything you'd want to drink in beverages."

    Your right, but I think the drink is supposed to be like a soda, more then it is a beer or a wine.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

    Post

    Maybe it just depends on your definition of non-alcoholic. At the bottom of your second link there is another link to http://www.dlc.fi/~marianna/gourmet/19_10.htm . The fine print states:
    *) In Finland commercially sold beverages containing alcohol less than 2,8 % are considered non-alcoholic. Store-bought meads typically have an alcohol content ranging between 0,5 and 2,8 %. Homemade mead may contain a very low amount of alcohol, but when made following this recipe, it is still suitable for children to drink.

    I wouldn't give 2.8% alcohol to a child. I don't believe that "Store-bought meads typically have an alcohol content ranging between 0,5 and 2,8 %." I'd look for another recipe from a different source.
    George

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clarksville, MI
    Posts
    92

    Post

    That's very similar to pop recipes I've seen - let it ferment just long enough to carbonate, then refridgerate to stop fermentation. The pop I've made was nasty, I don't try that anymore.

    If you want carbonated sugar water, use a keg and force carbonate. That's the only really safe way, in my opinion.
    <a href=\"http://www.slezakfarms.com\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.slezakfarms.com</a>

  6. #6

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    "I wouldn't give 2.8% alcohol to a child. I don't believe that "Store-bought meads typically have an alcohol content ranging between 0,5 and 2,8 %." I'd look for another recipe from a different source.
    George "

    I believe it was talking about finland.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    &gt; I wouldn't give 2.8% alcohol to a child...

    My parents always told me that I ought to "sleep tight".
    ... that's why I got into the Vodka at night. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    jim

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