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  1. #1

    Post

    A friend who has my ex-bees from 5 years ago, wanted to move the hive to someone else's house in town.

    WHat's the concensus about how far you have to move the colony to disrupt their desire to return to the same old location? We think the new home is only 1/4 mile away, way too close.

    He's thinking of moving them elsewhere for a day (basically leaving them in the pickup truck parked in the shade a few miles away).. I think a day isn't long enough for them to lose their 'homing' recollection of their old surroundings.

    Does anyone know what the minimum time is to 'take them elsewhere' in order to ultimately move them within the same neighborhood?
    urban top bar hives in Oakland and Berkeley, CA...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    This is what I do and I think it's much easier than moving a hive twice. Get a box, doesn't have to even be a hive, just a box that you can put in the old location with the entrance about the same place. Load the hive on the truck, put the box in the old location. Move the hive to the new location and at the end of each day at late dusk, get the box and shake the bees in there out into the hive at its new location.

    On the 3rd day you should have no returning bees except drones that just don't get it. You can shake them onto the ground and remove the box at that point.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,084

    Post

    72 hours is long enough to trigger reorientation. It's hard to close up a fill sized hive in the summer for 72 hours without them overheating. Scot's plan is about as good as any. Add a branch or a board in front of the new location to help reorient and that's pretty much what I'd do.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmoving.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4

    Post

    Move the hive ,put a piece of glass in front of the hive ,where the entrance is,and the problem is solved.It is something I never tried but ,it is written that it is 100% effective
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    In fact you can have 100% success moving hives without doing anything. But you will still loose some bees, and the ones that hang out in the old location can get cranky.

    You'll still get bees back at the old location no matter what you do, so no matter what you do put the box there to catch them and shake them back into the hive for 3 days.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

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