Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Santa Fe, New Mexico
    Posts
    61

    Post

    I'll lump this into the stupid question category. In the afternoon, for a limited amount of time, there are big groups of bees buzzing around the hive. I have always assumed that it was when the main foraging force was coming in, but since the hive swarmed, I am wondering if it is a sign the hive is preparing to swarm in the near future.

    I would like to say thousands of bees are circling near the hive, but that is probably an exagerration. It is more in the realm of hundreds.

    Now that I hived the swarm, both hives seem to do it at about the same time of day. And I wouldn't think the new hive would have any impulse to swarm, but I thought it was worth asking:

    Is it normal for large groups of bees to be buzzing arond the hive in the mid to late afternoon?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    228

    Post

    I've seen the same thing happen with my hives. Many times in the afternoon the bees start to leave in great numbers and fly around in the area of the hive. This may go on for 20 to 30 minutes. Then the bees go back and the hive settles down. I work with africanized bees but they are never agressive when they do this. This will continue to happen at about the same time each day. It doesn't appear to have anything to do with foraging. I'm not sure if it has anything to do with swarming. So anyways, I'm curious also as to what may be happening.
    ----------

    Tom

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lee Center, NY
    Posts
    150

    Post

    I have the same thing happening between 2 and 3 O'clock in the afternoon and it lasts for about a half hour. This happens everyday the weather is nice and according to the book I have on bees it is orientation flights by the young bees and is nothing to be concerned with.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    It seems to me to usually be a traffic jam. Only so many bees can land at once, and their form of air traffic control seems to be to avoid collisions. Thus they don't land ontop of each other and knock each other to the ground.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,321

    Post

    Sounds like young bees orienting.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I'd say the same thing if they weren't usually laden with pollen. Least for me they have been.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads