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Thread: number of bars

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    6,081

    Question

    My new tbh has 31 frames. Two end removable bars are vented bars with no foundation strip. This leaves 29 for the bees to work. Keeping in mind, I believe Barry or someone else, mentioning that once you get larger than 12 inches of hanging honeycomb, a chance of collapse takes over in the summer, I made mine 15 inches from bar to the floor. Figuring that the bees will make the comb an inch or two short. The bars are 20 inches long, but with a foundation area of about 17 or 18 inches.

    With all this said, is that enough for bees to overwinter in the north such as Pennsylvania? Do they store honey the same as in traditional frames or are the tbh comb storage guidelines any different?

    How big, or how many frames of honey is needed? And is this reasoning different based the bees movement from side to side?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,599

    Post

    BjornBee

    I'm populating my first long hives now
    my thinking was that if you build them so you can super then (I did) the you should build the main body so the the area of all the combs is about the same as what you would have to overwinter a langstroth setup in your area
    if you don't plan on supering it you should make it longer so you have room for them to store excess in the flow
    what dimensions are you using?

    Dave

    [size="1"][ June 27, 2006, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Post

    Dave, I made it up just free style after seeing a couple last year.

    If this makes sense, I started with an angle that would be a 12-7 pitch. Not sure what that comes out too, but I know what it means in roofing.

    Across the top its 27" wide, 19.5" deep and 44"long. From the bar to the floor its about 15". This leaves a three inch dead space above the bars for summer heat, and winter feeding of fondant or bee candy. This three inches above the bars extend the angle of the side upward and makes it look much bigger. The 31 bars are measured at 1-3/8.

    I am planning of carni or russian bees in it, so the honey area should be sufficient for over-wintering. Personally I feel its odd to place supers on a tbh, but maybe thats just me. I have seen the "trough" style tbh, and feel thats its just the same as a normal hive once the supers are placed on it.

    My next type I want to build is a half barrel. Looks neat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    The one thing I have noticed is my bees build to within about 3/8" of the bottom. So your combs may be longer than you think.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    chatsworth, calif usa
    Posts
    405

    Post

    >Across the top its 27" wide, 19.5" deep<

    That's about three deeps worth of honey on one bar, mighty heavy. If if gets hot, it may start a domino effect inside- not good. :mad:

    They may not build it all the way to the bottom at first. Older comb is alot stronger than the new wax and might not cause a problem after awhile but it may be a good idea to keep a sharp eye out in the beginning.

    In my limited experience, i have found that they tend to have brood bars in the center and honey bars toward the outer ends. The outer bars are just honey.
    -j
    My Mom's other kids are smarter than me, but i'm not nearly as nice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Post

    Jim,

    Thats the total demensions of the hive itself. The bars sit on cleats several inches below the top. That way there is a dead-space area above the bars for heat collection/feeding/storage/etc. The bars themselves are 20 inches long with a wax build area of 17 or 18 inches. The total from the bar to the floor is 15 inches.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi BjornBee,

    I've got top bars that are about the same dimension as yours. And I haven't had any problems with over wintering.

    And I haven't had any problems with collapsed comb since I raised the cover on my tbh during hot weather. Also be very carefull with any new comb as it is very fragile regardless of size.

    My bees don't work horizontally during the winter. That's where a taller comb can be an advantage over a shorter comb. They work from the core of the broodnest, near the entrance, outward. The broodnest will get larger or smaller but doesn't really move up or down or sideways.

    Regards
    Dennis

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