Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Washington County, NY
    Posts
    115

    Post

    I can tell that beekeeping will most likely be somewhat addictive..., and would like to build some more tbh next winter. I have next to no woodworking skills (yet). Which tools do you use and/or would recommend for a beginner?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ottawa Ontario Canada
    Posts
    28

    Post

    an inexpensive tablesaw and a chopsaw make the construction easy and construction precise. a hand drill is also useful. I can construct a complete 3 deep hive with slatted bottom and all bars in less than a day. Some of the Kenyan designs would take no more than a morning.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    york co south carolina
    Posts
    52

    Post

    hi space bee
    iam a beginner beek to , but i have been a carpenter / wood worker for 20 years .
    start with the basics
    a good tape measure , i like fatmax
    speed square
    circular saw - brand is not important , don't get a used one , a good new one is around $100 . get a portercable dewalt ryobi etc
    a good hand saw will help too
    safty glasses and hearing protection is a must
    a 1" chisel and a razor knife and a chaulk line
    with this set up you can build everything from a tbh to a house
    i just finished a ktbh and a deep tbh
    good luck and find a good carpenter friend to show you some of the safty precautions when useing a circ saw
    best of luck and watch out , building stuff is as addictive as beekeeping
    stephen

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    3pepper
    Why a circular saw instead of a table saw?
    DH taught me how to use the table saw for this project and we were able to do all of it with the table saw.
    We also used a router, but that was for the window. If we hadn't put in a window then we wouldn't have needed it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Post

    You can get by with just a hand saw. A circular saw will be easier. A table saw will be easier than that. Just a table saw works fine. And a drill and a countersink bit and a screwdriver bit and some deck screws. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    york co south carolina
    Posts
    52

    Post

    a decent circ saw can do anything a table saw can do , for a fraction of the price . also the small portable and homeowner tablesaws are the most potentialy dangerous tools in unskilled hands . i never recomend them for beginers unless they have a qualified friend to teach them the basic safety precautions . no doubt a table saw is a primary tool ( i have 2 )and in skilled hands they save time and increase the level of quality of your cuts . BUT , i have seen the damage done to both skilled and unskilled workers who let thier concentration slip. make no doubt , a table saw will eat your hands if you make a mistake .
    a circ saw can do the same , but is much more forgiving . it can produce cabanet quality cuts with minimal investment and minimal space requierments . it is much cheaper and faster . and as for crosscuts , cutting boards to length , it is much easier , safer , and produces a better quality of cut . crosscutting a 16 foot board into 4 foot pieces on a small tablesaw is cumbersome and requiers a second person to be done safely . whereas a circsaw and sawhorses you can cut boards to length in minuits with no setup time .
    i would not teach someone to use a table saw unless they could use a circsaw proficiently . also don't bother to buy a table saw unless you already own a circ saw .

    i do love table saws but feel strongly against the small light weight saws . better to get a
    $100 circ saw .
    hope this helps
    stephen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Washington County, NY
    Posts
    115

    Post

    Thank you all! I'll start looking.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    If you follow Scot McPherson's design, the long 1x12 doesn't need cutting at all. The 1x8 will need beveling on both sides.
    Here's the plans I used to make mine.
    http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/forum_topics.asp?FID=6
    I used a table saw because it was easy to make the bevels. A guide could be used with the circular saw.

    As far as the cheap table saws are concerned, I bought a $29 Sears tabletop tablesaw in 1969 and made all of my bee equipment with it. I bought a Unisaw in 1978 and although it is a much better saw, the little table saw did the same job just as good. In some cases, I liked it better because I could get closer and see what I was doing better.
    I would recommend using a tablesaw because it is much easier to make the setups.

    [size="1"][ June 15, 2006, 01:31 PM: Message edited by: Jon McFadden ][/size]
    Jon, N6VC/5

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I use a table saw, router, screw gun and glue, sometimes a hammer.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Posts
    59

    Post

    How would you cut a kerf for starter strips or a bevel on the finished top bars with a circular saw? These cuts are better done on a table saw. And while you could rip 2x4's to one and three eights inch width with a circular saw, a table saw will be more acurate and better suited to the task. Since one hive will need 20+ bars the table saw will be faster for acurate ripping. Leave the blade guard on, clear the area of trip hazards, use push sticks, don't stand directly behind the blade, use eye and hearing protection and READ THE SAFTEY INSTRUCTIONS. I bought a 10" table saw for $100 at the local home store and it works great. A circular saw is the right tool for building the rest of the hive.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    The router is for the bevel...

    The ryobi you bought is great until the angle crank breaks...
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Post

    i got a cheapy $78 table saw and find it indespensable for top bars. ive made about fifty hives with it so far and if it breaks i figure i got my use out of it. ive also got a $20 air stapler that isnt necessary but makes life much easier.
    all that is gold does not glitter

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