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  1. #21

    Post

    I noticed some “guarantees” about falling combs. Well… not so quick. I have 3 kinds of sizes of Kenyans. External dimension of bar is 22”, 23. and 23 ¾” ; height from 11” to 13”. (I am a bit afraid of 16”). Hives are 4’long with movable separator as needed.
    Up to now no any fallen combs, spontaneous or during manipulation. (stationary)
    My conviction is that a reason for spontaneous falling combs is temperature, - not adequate insulation, especially on the top but certainly not only
    as I have already mention about it last year and I didn’t change my opinion.
    My hives have flat cover made with 1” pink Styrofoam in wooden frame hanging slightly below edge of hive, to ensure that water is not getting on bars and inside, as I presented it on picture last year. Out side this is covered with thin layer of synthetic stucco to make it hard. In addition there is ½” thick soft foam (under carpet padding) enclosed and sealed with soft plastic on bots sides. This serves as additional insulation and since is soft it fills all space between caver and bars. This way there is no external air and there is no vapor to condensate. It is light and stucco gives me excellent erosion protection in addition to thermal insulation of Styrofoam and sponge. I described it last year in more details in my home page but it is in Polish language. Pictures are in English
    http://homepage.interaccess.com/~net...ekshives2.html
    http://homepage.interaccess.com/~net...ezramkowy.html

    May be not too large but rather unnecessarily large because lack of forages.

    I also noticed that with of bars 1 ½” is often not sufficient in storage area. This is not a problem since ¼” slant put between bars if necessary solves it.

    May be not too large but rather unnecessarily large because lack of forages.

    I also noticed that with of bars 1 ½” is often not sufficient in storage area. This is not a problem since ¼” slant put between bars if necessary solves it.


    Also, regarding size. I think that these sizes are too large for my area, (city dweller). Simply, there are no enough forages for such sizes, otherwise this would be just right.
    May be not too large but rather unnecessarily large because lack of forages.

    I also noticed that with of bars 1 ½” is often not sufficient in storage area. This is not a problem since ¼” slant put between bars if necessary solves it.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Dennis,
    I knew you were moving to Florida. We've been talking about it for the last 2 or 3 years. I didn't know it was going to happen now though. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Florida (tropical) beekeeping is very different from temperate beekeeping. The lack of a real killing winter changes the dynamics of everything from honey management to pests and disease. Got honey, pollen, moths and beetles and everything else going on nearly 365 days of the year. It just slows down a bit in winter.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Scot and Everyone,

    &gt;Florida (tropical) beekeeping is very different from temperate beekeeping.

    That's one of the big reasons I'm moving. It's time for a big change. And if I don't do it now, I never will. I sure don't know a thing about beekeeping in the tropics, other than what I've read. And I sure don't know what good Florida bee pasture looks like.

    I will probably try a much shorter tbh there. I speculate that the advantage of taller comb wouldn't be needed as the bees probably don't cluster for overwintering and can get feed anywhere in the hive. A taller comb could prove to be a disadvantage with more frequent, less intense flows. The bees might just store the more limited surplus in the broodnest and not put much of it toward the rear of the hive where it can easily be harvasted.

    Regards
    Dennis

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    There are 3 intense flows. They may not be as intense as northern clover flow for instance, but they aren't anything to cough at.

    Citrus, alsike clover, and palm/palmetto

    Most of the generic (wildflower) florida honey is the palmetto honey. Its dark and watery, but intense fruity flavor.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    To add it seems here the major flows where I am in iowa are yellow sweet clover and alfalfa concurrently and then golden rod in the fall.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

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