Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Loveland,CO
    Posts
    17

    Post

    I'm in my first year of beekeeping and this site has been great! I usually find answers to my questions through the search. I greatly appreciate the willingness of everyone to share.
    Smile [img]smile.gif[/img]

    The temps have been in the 90's here the last several days and I kept seeing a bunch of bees on my landing board. I assumed I was going to need to do something about ventilation until I went out today and took a closer look. The landing board was packed with bees and a bunch in the entrance, but none of them were beating their wings like I'd expected if they were fanning (is that what I would see?). All of them, including the ones hanging upside down in the entrance, shuffling up and back and were "biting" the wood as if they were trying to gather somthing from it. What are they doing? I also have a Lang hive right next to it with a of bunch (fewer) on the landing board doing the same thing. I took a couple of pictures, posted here with some of my TBH: http://www.flickr.com/photos/53396337@N00/
    Thanks
    Kristal

  2. #2

    Post

    Its normal to see bees bearding sometimes to the extent of hanging like a small swarm when temps are in the mid 90s - 100. On those hot days even venting will not reduce bearding much as brood needs to maintian about 93 deg +- 1 and on say 96 deg day most of the bees will just bee trouble to keeping hive cool regardless. Only a smaller number is needed inside to fan hive to keep it cool and raise brood.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    Do a search on bearding.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Looks more like washboarding to me than bearding. Washboarding means the bees are getting ready for another flow.

    Bearding is a sign of heat intolerance (its too hot inside), bees getting ready to swarm don't just beard down from the landing board but also upwards and around the sides too usually.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Beewildered . . .
    &gt;shuffling up and back and were "biting" the wood

    WASHBOARD or ROCKING BEHAVIOR - Only in very populous colonies, usually in early evening [Ref 15, p23], and especially on warm evenings [Ref 12, p314], bees “perform” an interesting activity on front wall and alighting area of hive. Standing on the 2nd and 3rd pairs of legs and facing hive entrance, they (a hundred or more bees [Ref 9, p465]) will thrust their bodies forward and backward similar to scrubbing clothes on a washboard. Exact purpose of this activity is not understood [Ref 15, p23] but probably serves as a cleaning process [Ref 12, p314].


    Scot McPherson . . .
    &gt;getting ready for another flow . . .

    Do you have a reference?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Yes, its called experience.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    &gt; shuffling up and back and were "biting" the wood

    Classic washboarding.

    Varnishing the decks, just like bored sailors.
    Nothing to worry about, normal when the bees
    get bored.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Loveland,CO
    Posts
    17

    Post

    Thanks everyone for the information and reference.

    Scot McPherson . . .
    &gt;getting ready for another flow . . .

    Is that an indication of a pending honey flow in this area? I have no experience yet with Busy Bee times. They only have one top bar left in the hive that is not drawn at all and then the follower board. Only about 8 of the current 16 bars with comb are fully drawn across the width of the hive. I need to finish putting the comb guides on the remaining bars(for 3O total). Do I need to get this done ASAP?
    Kristal

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Put the top bars between well drawn and already capped combs. You won't need a comb guide.

    I cut my comb guides right into the top bars with a router. No fuss later.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads