Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    I haven't purchased a smoker yet. Money's been real tight and I've been reading that many people do without one with a TBH. I thought I'd get a package or a captured swarm and just kind of shake them in and leave them be for a while. Well, I just got a call from the guy I asked for some bees from and he's gotten an established hive with comb. I've been reading here on the forum about the swarm capture frames and I think I've got something that will work rigged up. BUT...since they've got something to protect....ie comb, are they going to come after me? If it's likely they're going to try to kill me then I will bite the bullet and run into OKC and buy a smoker. Luckily there is a greenhouse in town that carries some beekeeping supplies. I was hoping to try it without and save the 35 bucks, but I don't know about cutting up comb, wiring it in, etc. It sounds a little more invasive than inspecting a hive one bar at a time.
    What do you think?
    I am excited to be getting my bees tomorrow. Excited and scared!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,486

    Post

    Do you have a beesuit or at least a veil? If so you might be ok. Get you a pipe and some tobacco!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    I do have a veil. We don't smoke, but any other ideas on a simple smoke source? Maybe a fire in a coffee can and a hand fan?

  4. #4

    Post

    All depends.... Is your insurance paid up? Seriously though,, you'll need a smoker. It will make all the diff in an enjoyable learning experiance and swearing off beekeeping as a hobby forever. I've been in it for 24 years and though there may be some on the forum with a brass set that would try something as invasive as comb removal/frameup without one, not this old bean. At least not without banging back a fifth first.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I see them on ebay for $5 sometimes.

    Here's one for $1.99.........

    Smokers are handy.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/OLD-OLD-wooden-B...QQcmdZViewItem

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    I do jobs regulerly like that and sometimes get 40 to 50 stings which doesn't bother me all that much. I would not go into one without a smoker. I like to keep my stings under 200, so a smoker is necessary. If you don't buy the smoker, at least buy a half dozen epi-pens. You are going to need them.
    Also, wear a pair of coveralls, taped at the ankles and wrist, and a good pair of thick gloves along with your veil. If you try your first cut out without this equip., you will NOT continue to keep bees. It will have the worst day of your life. After 30 years experience, I still hit hives that just refuse to stay calm.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Kennett Square, PA
    Posts
    608

    Post

    I agree with OGSHBIDO Get yourself a smoker and make it an enjoyable learning experience.
    Southeast PA - 7 colonies, local mutts on natural comb, TF
    George Imirie's INDEXED Pink Pages: http://goo.gl/WiZUH3

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    OK, I'll go get the smoker in the morning. One question though. What if I didn't fasten the comb to the top bars? What if I I just lean the comb against the side in the bottom of the hive? Ok, that's two questions.
    Also, I'm not actually doing the cut out. I'm getting a box of bees and comb from someone who does bee removals. The problem is how to get this established in my TBH.

    Sundance, that smokers really cool and I'm sure I can save money on E-Bay, but my problem is I get my bees tomorrow. So, I've got no choice but to spend the $35 to get one tomorrow, unless there is something I can rig with household materials.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    Buy a cigar. A smoker is well worth what it costs. If I HAD to make do, I'd make a can with a hole at the top for the smoke to come out and a pipe on the bottom to blow the air in.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    I don't use a smoker and I usually wear shorts and a tee-shirt weather permitting (now that I live in iowa, sometimes its jeans and a sweatshirt). Some bees get antsy but I get stung maybe 3 or 4 times a visit to my yards and I work through a few hundred hives.

    A veil is a necessity even if you don't use it all the time, sometimes you'll have a hive that you can't work without a veil. I don't use a smaoker because one of my buyers will only buy honey that I have legally committed to being smoke free. Smoke does get into the honey no matter how careful you are with it.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  11. #11

    Post

    I've heard that liquid smoke works if you dilute it with water and spritz it on. I've never tried it, but might tomorrow morning when I try to get a colony out of the eaves of a neighbor's house... I sure hope it works!

  12. #12

    Post

    &gt;what if I didn't fasten.....
    You'll have a mess
    &gt;What if I lean comb ....
    You'll have a bigger mess.

    Bees would begin drawing comb were you would not want it.
    Unless TBH is based on Lang dimensions where you could install frames in TBH you'll need to cut out a few frames of comb and attach to top bar to get things started. Set hive your getting where you want your TBH to be and give bees a few days to orient to that spot. Then cut and fasten a few frames of brood to top bars (be sure you get queen in TBH) and move old hive 10' or so and place TBH were old hive was. Field bees will return to and set up house in TBH then after a day finish removeing bees and comb from old hive and place in TBH. This way there is not as much cut out being done initially when there is alot of bees in old hive. And after the next day older bees will be in TBH and only young (and fewer) bees will be in old hive making it a little easier.
    As far a smoker goes beekeepers are a friendly lot by nature. Check with your local beek oranization and explain your situation to someone active in it and I'm sure you could find someone willing to lend you one if not buy cheaply plus they would be able to give you pionters/help with your move. Good luck

    [size="1"][ June 02, 2006, 10:26 PM: Message edited by: onlygoodSHBisdeadone ][/size]

  13. #13

    Post

    It depend on your bees and time when you are checking them.Most times I feel I can do just fine without the smoker but sometimes like when you have some difficult operation like what you plan to do a little bit of smoke would help you and the bees to be calm.If nothing else lite a smokey fire in a tin can and puff the smoke on the hive

    deehovey &gt;
    ie comb, are they going to come after me? If it's likely they're going to try to kill me then I will bite the bullet and run into OKC and buy a smoker

    The bees have never come at me.Really never.Bee gentle and slow.I have rip apart my tbh few days ago and I got sting 2-3 times only.
    "Do nothing. Time is too precious to waste." Buddha

  14. #14

    Post

    deehovey

    I was planning on getting a new smoker this week; If you would like to have my used one your welcome to it. My used one works perfect, I've just been wanting a larger one.

    Just PM me your mailing address and I'll UPS it to ya. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Langsroth used a spray of sugar water. Will has tried this, but I didn't think it worked all that great. I've always used smoke.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    I've survived!!!! No stings! I ended up not getting ahold of the people I was going to borrow a smoker from. We used a tin can and fanned it some with some cardboard or the bee brush.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    26

    Post

    Here's a pic of the smoker we used. Pretty darn simple but it seemed to work. Either that or these were really gentle bees. Actually I think it was a combination of the two.

    Simple tin can smoker

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    If you poke a few small holes in the sides near the bottom and poke two holes at the top and put a wire bale on it for a handle, it will be MUCH handier.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,019

    Post

    FWIW, I have given up smokers (and smoking!) and now use a water spray with some drops of essentail oil of White Birch (smells remarkably like smoke) and sometimes Lemongrass and Peppermint.

    Smoke tends to drive bees down into the hive, but often it drives them into the air as well. It also triggers the bees' alarm response, causing them to rush to their honey stores and stuff themselves, ready to go into 'emergency swarm' mode. This is a waste of bee energy (and foraging time) as they have to put it all back again when you go away.

    Water spray makes them 'freeze' rather than go down, which is not so good if you want to see between frames, but ideal for a TBH where there is no gap between bars anyway. A little sugar dissolved in the water makes them slightly sticky and less liable to fly, so they get busy cleaning each other instead of panicking.

    I use a pump-up spray holding about a litre (sorry, liter - sorry, a quart[?]) and you can calm the most defensive bees by just spraying more water until they give up. It does no harm to the bees, or the beekeeper, and it works. I will be happy never to use a smoker again.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    &gt;Smoke tends to drive bees down into the hive, but often it drives them into the air as well.

    Then you're smoking far too much. It should really do neither if you're using appropriate amounts. It should just calm them. One or two puffs from a well lit smoker is usually plenty to keep a typical hive clam for quite some time.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads