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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Posts
    59

    Post

    I finally did some repair work on the crossed combs in my 1 y/o TBH. They had a lot of surplus honey and we are not even in the main flow yet so I did a bit of trimming and added empty bars between straight comb. After crushing, the drained combs went in my solar wax melter for rendering. I ended up with a nice quantity of beautiful yellow wax but the older darker combs don't seem to be melting. They have reduced somewhat but they have yet to completely melt. Will these eventually melt into a usable wax or are they a disposable by-product? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Post

    >but the older darker combs don't seem to be melting. They have reduced somewhat but they have yet to completely melt. Will these eventually melt into a usable wax or are they a disposable by-product?

    Old brood has a lot of cocoons in it. The cocoons absorb wax so you often get nothing from old dark brood combs without a press to squeeze it out.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Posts
    59

    Post

    Ah, that explains the paper like texture. I'm planning on building a honey press, now it will do double duty. Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Post

    >now it will do double duty

    If you can put the press in a tub of boiling water and put the combs in a burlap sack and press it, you can extract a lot of wax from old brood combs.

    Walter T. Kelly sells a wax press. Unfortunately it is expensive.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5

    Post

    I used to press wax in a cloth bag by putting it between two boards and using c-clamps, suspended over a bucket.

    Mark
    the cheapskate beekeeper

    [size="1"][ May 11, 2006, 03:32 AM: Message edited by: girl Mark ][/size]
    urban top bar hives in Oakland and Berkeley, CA...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Posts
    59

    Post

    Great idea, thanks Mark! I'm planning on building one from a scissor jack per the James Satterfield design but I have c-clamps, boards and a bunch of brood comb so I will try that first. Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Post

    Now you've got me wondering about putting it between boards and parking my car on them...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Kudus, Mark. I'll have to give that a try, too.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Post

    >Now you've got me wondering about putting it between boards and parking my car on them...

    How will you catch the wax?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Post

    Thinking ahead takes all the fun out of it Scrape it off the boards, or pick it up off the gravel and then run it through the solar melter, I suppose.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Post

    Nifty!

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