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  1. #1

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    in my area we usually have 2 deeps for our brood chambers..I built a long tbh and put a existing lang hive into it..now i have 18 brood frames and 10 frames for honey, I also have on a couple of supers..is the 18 brood frames fine for the tbh? or should it be less now that i'm using the tbh..our instructor in our bee group advises to use 2 deeps and rotate them every 3 weeks..thanks!!
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

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    >our instructor in our bee group advises to use 2 deeps and rotate them every 3 weeks..thanks!!

    Your instructor likes to work hard and make the bees work hard. I think they'd be more productive if they didn't have to rearrange the brood nest every three weeks.

    In the end the bees will sort this out for you. They will store brood in as many as they need to and honey in the rest. Most of my 33 bar hives are about half and half.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3

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    thanks MB.. how much honey do leave for them to winter on?
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

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    I went through my top bar hive today, and the brood nest was from bar 9 through 24. So that would correspond to what MB said, about 1/2 and 1/2.

    I made 2 splits from it to try to keep it from swarming and took a bar of last year's sweet clover / mint honey. WOW is it GOOD!

    blkcld if it is your first year you probably should leave quite a bit of honey. You will probably get some from culling / trimming your combs or just through accidents when they break off which will amount to a couple of top bars worth.

    Depends on what kind of a flow you get, but they will need to build a lot of comb.

    THis has been a great hive for me, started it from a package 3 years ago, got a split off it last year that is already 5 mediums high and just booming, and it was full of brood again today.

    No mite treatments last year at all on it, although I used the OA crack pipe on it the year before. Tons of drone. Could not find the queen, but I got some good brood comb with eggs for my splits.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

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    >how much honey do leave for them to winter on?

    I try to have nearly a full box, but it never is. With the ferals I probably don't need a full box. With the Italians I might. I just harvest often during the year and never too much at once. As long as they have drawn comb for most of the hive, you can always feed if they don't fill it all in with the fall flow.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

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    Michael,
    So are you saying with our climate we need to leave the box full going into winter? I would think the honey left over the brood nest and a few frames to one side would be enough.

    You dont' want honey on both ends of the brood nest unless there is enough honey on either side to sustain the bees through winter. One of the reasons why I keep the brood nest in the front is the bees are mostly forced to move from front to back as winter progresses, thereby preventing them from getting stuck and starving midwinter 2 ft away from the nearest honey.

    What do you think about that? And having thought about that would you still recommend a full box of honey for winter? Most people recommend 50-80 lbs for italians in northern climates.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

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    &gt;So are you saying with our climate we need to leave the box full going into winter?

    It's never totally and it will depend on the race of bees, but for Italians I'd say yes. I try to leave that for the ferals, but they probably don't need it.

    &gt; I would think the honey left over the brood nest and a few frames to one side would be enough.

    With ferals, probably. But two deeps is the standard overwintering configuration here for Italians.

    &gt;You dont' want honey on both ends of the brood nest unless there is enough honey on either side to sustain the bees through winter.

    Agreed. They might go off in one direction and get to the end and never use what's at the other end. In fact that's what I would predict. I try to have the brood nest at the back.

    &gt; One of the reasons why I keep the brood nest in the front is the bees are mostly forced to move from front to back as winter progresses, thereby preventing them from getting stuck and starving midwinter 2 ft away from the nearest honey.

    That works. I just like them in the back so I can super and not have to move the supers to get to the brood.

    &gt;What do you think about that? And having thought about that would you still recommend a full box of honey for winter?

    That depends on the size of the cluster.

    &gt; Most people recommend 50-80 lbs for italians in northern climates.

    Around here most people have about 90 to 120 lbs.

    "Colonies maintained in two deep brood chambers should weigh 125 lb at the beginning of winter."
    http://entomology.unl.edu/beekpg/tid...1.htm#Article1

    But the ferals don't need nearly that much. Still I much prefer a surplus in the spring to starving bees. I don't like to have to feed them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    &gt;&gt;&gt;Around here most people have about 90 to 120 lbs.
    ...
    But the ferals don't need nearly that much. Still I much prefer a surplus in the spring to starving bees. I don't like to have to feed them.&lt;&lt;&lt;

    I agree, I was just considering what I have heard about overwintering. I like to make sure they have enough to make it through the next winter no matter what time of year. However, I also don't want to leave so much on that I could have harvested safely without endangering the bees.
    Scot Mc Pherson<br />McPherson Family Honey Farms<br />Davenport, IA<br />BeeWiki: <a href=\"http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org\" target=\"_blank\">http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org</a> <br /><br />Pics:<br /> <a href=\"http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/\" target=\"_blank\">http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/pics/bees/</a>

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