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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    There might be a way to improve the crush and strain method. While keeping commercial bees, several of the processes used the bouyant force between honey and beeswax for seperation. It's a strong force as there's a great difference in density between the two.

    I built a honey sump with a series of baffles that would force the honey and wax to go under and over them with about a foot difference. A 'wave' would be created with the wax riding the crest in the first couple of baffles.

    This bouyant force was also used to prepare honey for bottling. A series of large storage tanks were placed on a platform that stepped down in heigth for each tank. The highest tank was filled from the sump. And then honey was siphoned off the bottom of each tank, into the top of the next lowest tank. Bottling was done off the bottom of the last tank. The effect was of one very tall, about 30' high, tank. Two forces, gravity, and bouyancy made this system very effective.

    Cut and strain takes advantage of gravity, but doesn't use bouyancy. This method might be improved by the use of both forces.

    One way that it might be used on my double bucket type strainer, would be to intially prevent the honey from draining away from the top bucket. The wax would be allowed to rise to the top. Once that occurs, the honey would be allowed to drain into the bottom bucket. And they the honey/wax is allowed to drip out as before.

    I've got a idea how this could be done. What do you guys think? What's the simpliest method? Is it worth the effort? Is anyone ready to harvest and willing to give it a test?

    Regards
    Dennis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    For a larger scale it might be a good method. They sell settling tanks that are made to do that.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    88

    Post

    I think it could be done on a smaller scale also. What are we? Men or Beekeekers?
    What are we, men or Beekeepers?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    606

    Post

    im not ready to harvest yet but i learned long time ago that in agriculture preparing three months in advance is the way to do. i dont picture the baffles but i do understand that waiting a couple of days after crushing the comb helps it strain. now that im thinking about it tho i figure it might as well be straining while its sitting.
    when i have more mash than buckets can handle ive been thinking about using a utility sink from the hardware store. what do you think?
    all that is gold does not glitter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I just think on a small scale the bucket works fine. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    I think I will modify the top bucket of my strainer by drilling a single hole in it rather than perforating it. I'll plug the hole from the bottom of the bucket. Then I'll let it set until the wax rises to the top. Then I'll pull the plug and let the strainer work as before.

    But it will be awhile. Probably into August.

    Regards
    Dennis

  7. #7

    Post

    http://homepage.interaccess.com/~net...nki%20comp.jpg

    Is this what you meant, Dennis?
    The plug is not on this picture. It is on a stick which is slightly longer then height of this 5 gal bucket. Useful to prevent dripping when changing buckets when lower bucket is full, or when upper bucket is filled but not ready to start filtration.
    This was done last year. For this year I modified it to make more efficient and more practical. I also modified some details in my this year hives. I will publish it in a future.
    There are two levels of filtration. The first stainless #8 (not visible on 5 gal bucket) and the second, - nylon cloth, visible.

    The first two pictures of vessels 2.5 gal. Too small, impractical, at least for me. 5 gal. seems to be just right.
    This picture with description is in my home page, but it is in Polish.
    http://homepage.interaccess.com/~net...ezramkowy.html

    Wojtek

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Thornton Colorado
    Posts
    2,003

    Post

    I really have no suggestions because I've never done this before but I am wondering if you could describe the problem that you are trying to solve?

    I have to guess that the honey you end up with in the bottom bucket still has some wax in it?
    JohnF INTP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    606

    Post

    i think johnf asked a great question. for myself ive always had more problems with having to much honey in the wax in the top bucket. it might be worth using a combination strain/press.
    all that is gold does not glitter

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