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  1. #1

    Post

    I have some old bars that I want to get rid of (they are too wide) but they always seem to have brood or eggs in them. I'd hate to kill the brood by simply removing the bars. What should I do? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    As the weather warms and you no longer have to worry about getting chilled brood, begin to move them out towards the outside of the super instead of the middle. Then move them up to the next super, provided you have the same size super above it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Post

    you could cut the comb off the bar and reatatch it to the new size bar with rubber bands. another altrnative might be to move the bar back (meaning towards storage) every time you do an inspection.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,599

    Post

    I just keep working them to the outside of the broodnest. Eventually they will fill them with nectar. If it's too FAT, you can use a sharp cold uncapping knife (cutting bottom to top so you don't stress the comb too much) to cut the protruding honey off.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5

    Post

    thanks! I'll get on it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Heritage,

    The easiest way is just to move it toward the honey storage area and then harvest it for strained honey later in the year.

    But, if the weather is warm enough, the could could be cut off and placed horizontally, on the floor, at the back of the hive. The brood will hatch. The bees will salvage any pollen and honey. Then the combs can be removed and rendered. If the combs have lots of honey in them, make sure they are in a pan that will contain any honey that might flow out from them. Be sure to leave a little space between the combs so that hatching bees aren't trapped.

    Regards
    Dennis

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