Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: day 2

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Burlingame, CA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    It is day 2 of my first hive which also happens to be a TBH. Here are pictures of the hive, the swarm before hiving, and the interior of the hive after 2 days: http://www.z2a.org/photos.bees/

    Anyway, after 2 days the interior looks like a big cluster. Is that normal? Are they making combs under that huge pile of bees?

  2. #2

    Post

    Looks normal to me! isn't it a neat thing to see?

    Mark
    urban top bar hives in Oakland and Berkeley, CA...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    See all those white specks on the bottom, I'll bet they are wax flakes and in a very short time your cluster is gonna spread out to show off all that nice white comb. Nice pictures. Looks real nice. Are you feeding them?? Prehaps if you set out, or feed them inside, some 1:1 it might help them draw a little faster. Just an idea.
    I'm jealous, no swarm calls yet, BUT it is still a bit early for them here. Haven't seen a drone yet.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Post

    &gt;Anyway, after 2 days the interior looks like a big cluster. Is that normal?

    Yes.

    &gt; Are they making combs under that huge pile of bees?

    Yes.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Burlingame, CA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    Wow... I read every beekeeping website I could find as well as several print book but it seems like every step of the way there are still surprises. This is fun!

    &gt; Are you feeding them??

    I did put out a quart of sugar water but I'm not goig to put out anymore unless I think they're getting hungry. I'm trying to take a less-is-more approach.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Feeding them will help them to build the comb, don't worry about 'spoiling' them, when the necture flow begins they will ignore the sugar water.
    You learn something new about them every day, and you will every day. That is one of the fun things about them.
    Don't be to afraid to think 'outside the box'.

    [size="1"][ April 05, 2006, 10:58 AM: Message edited by: SilverFox ][/size]
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Post

    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Burlingame, CA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    Cool picture. It looks like they've got some combs going.

    Thanks for your website Michael! When I saw the words "Lazy Beekeeping" in my google search results I knew I'd found something worth reading. It was through your site that I found out about TBHs. It is really cool to have bees that I caught myself in a hive that I built myself. With my limited woodworking skills I never could have built a Langstroth hive which is all I'd heard about to that point.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Brucebee,

    The bees are building comb inside that cluster. Once they've got a few combs built, the cluster can expand and build comb even more rapidly than they are now.

    Right now, in most climates, these bees would be very vunerable. If bad weather sets in, they could quickly run short of food. I would dump some sugar or feed them some syrup, in a feeder, in the back of the tbh. The sugar would last longer without fermenting if the bees don't need it. The syrup would be more readily available, but might ferment if not consumed quickly by the bees.

    A quick look won't bother them. But I wouldn't disturb them very much for the first couple of weeks.

    Thanks for sharing the photos. Neat hive. I like your cover. It's very suitable for a hotter climate than mine. I'll probably use something like that when I move to Florida. And neat bees!

    Regards
    Dennis

    [size="1"][ April 05, 2006, 08:15 PM: Message edited by: B Wrangler ][/size]

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads