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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    30

    Post

    Placed captured swarm into tbh today. Checked them after supper and they were still there. Just got in, and every bee is gone. TB's have a strip of wax across the top of the bar. Design made following plans found on website. I didn't supply any feed. Suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Did you leave the hive in the area where you caught the swarm? If so, the scouts came back and led them to their new home. I always move a swarm to another area where the returning scouts will not find them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Ft. Worth, Texas
    Posts
    30

    Post

    That's probably what happened. Thanks for the reply. Mike

  4. #4

    Post

    I caught a swarm last year, move it 10 miles and had it in a regular lang hive..the next day...no bees..all gone..
    Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms should be a convenience store not a government agency

  5. #5

    Post

    It's also possible that you lost the queen somehow- I actually try and spot her when removing a swarm if the swarmcatching process is messy (unlike , say, if the entire swarm is small and I get them ALL into the bucket in one shot and the queen doesnt' get a chance to go flying around in the confusion). I try and look at any remaing uncaught bees to see if she's out there before I leave the area.

    THey'll disperse if there's no queen and no brood.

    I think you can also spot if she's in there by what happens to any stray bees on the outside of your swarm catching box- I think the strays are more prone to land on the box and try to find a way in, rather than buzzing around and leaving. When I and my friends caught a lot of swarms it seemed like we had a sense for when something was wrong and we hadn't gotten the queen

    (once youre an established beekeeper, I think giving them some brood comb (minus rival bees) with eggs/larva in it might also keep them around (and if there was reason to suspect queenlessness this might make them raise a new one), but I have only "heard" that, and havne't tried it- anyone confirm or debunk the wisdom of this?)

    I got many hives as swarms and things usually went well- it's not very difficult despite my post making it sound like it might be risky.

    Mark

    [size="1"][ April 04, 2006, 06:36 AM: Message edited by: girl Mark ][/size]
    urban top bar hives in Oakland and Berkeley, CA...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    It sometimes takes several attempts to get a swarm to stay in a hive. Probably because you miss the queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    I have had a few do that, it kind of surprises you when you go to see how the bees are doing and there are no bees. I think that one frame of brood or a frame of drawn comb may have helped??? On a real hot sunny day it helps to put the colony in shaded area also! Just think and plan that the next one will cooperate with your plans for them.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    228

    Post

    If I take a swarm out of tree I always try to put two or even three combs of brood in the box with them. The vast majority usually stay. If I donÂ’t put anything in there with them they just about always take off. Also, bear in mind that this is for the flighty africanized bees. I imagine it might be even more successful with the Italians and such you have up north.

    ----------
    Tom

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